MEDIA ADVISORY STEM CELL INSTITUTE’S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY TASK FORCE TO CONSIDER GRANTS REQUIREMENTS FOR FOR-PROFIT ENTITIES Policy Intended to Encourage Treatment Development

SAN FRANCISCO, CA –The Intellectual Property (IP) Task Force of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) will meet on Thursday, November 9, 2006, at 1:00 p.m.

WHO:           The 12 members of the IP Task Force are appointed by the Independent Citizens Oversight Committee (ICOC), the 29-member     governing board for CIRM.

WHAT:         The Stem Cell Research and Cures Act (Proposition 71) authorizes CIRM to award research grants to for-profit organizations. Historically, the involvement of the for-profit research sector has been essential to the discovery and development of medical therapies and diagnostics. The proposed policy that will be considered on November 9th follows the CIRM Intellectual Property Policy for Non-Profit Organizations, approved by the ICOC on February 10, 2006, and is intended to provide terms and conditions to for-profit recipients of CIRM grants. There are no extant policy models that capture in entirety the intent of the State of California in its objectives to fund the for-profit research sector and provide a return to the state. As a consequence, this proposed policy is a unique synthesis of best practices and recommendations from funding agencies and foundations around the world.

WHEN:       Thursday, November 9 2006, 
                    1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Estimated)

 

WHERE:    CONNECT
                   8950 Villa La Jolla Drive
                   Suite A124
                   La Jolla, CA 92037

Note: The meeting is accessible by teleconference from three additional locations (see the agenda).

WHY:         Public-private partnerships involving research and development activities among industry, government, and universities can play an instrumental role in introducing key new technologies and valuable products to the commercial marketplace. Experience shows that partnerships involving government participation in research and development activities with industry, universities, and government laboratories can greatly facilitate the translation of basic research discoveries to products with societal benefits.

                   The mission of CIRM is to foster and promote stem cell research with the aim of improving human health. A secondary goal is to strengthen California’s biotechnology industry and create collateral economic benefits such as high-paying jobs and increased tax revenues. CIRM believes that the funding of commercial research organizations focused on stem cell-related projects is a key component to achieving the overall mission of the Institute. Increased interest by the commercial research sector in stem cell-related research projects and the successful translation of basic research discoveries into commercial products for public use are primary success indicators (among others) that can be used by CIRM to track benefits of commercial sector funding.

CIRM Contact: Dale A Carlson
  415/396-9117

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine