Optimization in the Identification, Selection and Induction of Maturation of Subtypes of Cardiomyocytes derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Optimization in the Identification, Selection and Induction of Maturation of Subtypes of Cardiomyocytes derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Funding Type: 
Tools and Technologies I
Grant Number: 
RT1-01143
Award Value: 
$870,717
Disease Focus: 
Heart Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
Status: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 

Year 1

The goal of our project is to develop methods to induce stem cells to differentiate into heart cells. Importantly, there are three major types of heart cells, which correspond to the ventricle (the major chambers that pump blood to the body), the atria (the smaller chambers that pump blood to the ventricles), and the nodes (these are the regions within the heart where the "pacemaker" cells are found, which control the heart rate). If we can produce pure populations of ventricular, atrial, or nodal cells, we can potentially use these cells for "replacement therapy" for patients which have had heart attacks or who have developed arrhythmias. During the first year of the research, we succeeded in producing cells that correspond to the ventricle. Furthermore, we have developed novel culturing techiques that improve the differentiation of the cells into atrial and nodal type myocytes, and the new strategies look very promising for the future research of this project.

Year 2

The goal of our project is to develop methods to induce stem cells to differentiate into heart cells. Importantly, there are three major types of heart cells, which correspond to the ventricle (the major chambers that pump blood to the body), the atria (the smaller chambers that pump blood to the ventricles), and the nodes (these are the regions within the heart where the "pacemaker" cells are found, which control the heart rate). If we can produce pure populations of ventricular, atrial, or nodal cells, we can potentially use these cells for "replacement therapy" for patients which have had heart attacks or who have developed arrhythmias. During the first year of the research, we succeeded in producing cells that correspond to the ventricle. Furthermore, we have developed novel culturing techiques that improve the differentiation of the cells into atrial and nodal type myocytes, and the new strategies look very promising for the future research of this project.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine