Arthritis

Coding Dimension ID: 
277
Coding Dimension path name: 
Arthritis

Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Cartilage Regeneration and Osteoarthritis

Funding Type: 
Early Translational I
Grant Number: 
TR1-01216
Investigator: 
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 118 431
Disease Focus: 
Arthritis
Bone or Cartilage Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Arthritis is the result of degeneration of cartilage (the tissue lining the joints) and leads to pain and limitation of function. Arthritis and other rheumatic diseases are among the most common of all health conditions and are the number one cause of disability in the United States. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $120 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. The prevalence of arthritic conditions is also expected to increase as the population increases and ages in the coming decades. Current treatment options for osteoarthritis is limited to pain reduction and joint replacement surgery. Stem cells have tremendous potential for treating disease and replacing or regenerating the diseased tissue. This grant proposal will be valuable in weighing options for using stems cells in arthritis. It is very important to know the effect of aging on stems cells and how stem cell replacement might effectively treat the causes of osteoarthritis. We will establish conditions for stem cells to repair a surgical defect in laboratory models and test efficacy in animal models of cartilage defects. We will demonstrate that stem cells have anti-arthritic effects, establish optimal conditions for stem cells to migrate into the diseased tissue and initiate tissue repair, and test efficacy in animal models of arthritis. We will plan safety and efficacy studies for the preclinical phase, identify collaborators with the facilities to obtain, process, and provide cell-based therapies, and identify clinical collaborators in anticipation of clinical trials. If necessary we will also identify commercialization partners. Stem cells fight disease and repair tissues in the body. We anticipate that stem cells implanted in arthritic cartilage will treat the arthritis in addition to producing tissue to heal the defect in the cartilage. An approach that heals cartilage defects as well as treats the underlying arthritis would be very valuable. If our research is successful, this could lead to first ever treatment of osteoarthritis with or without stem cells. This treatment would have a huge impact on the large numbers of patients who suffer from arthritis as well as in reducing the economic burden created by arthritis.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California has been at the forefront of biomedical research for more than 40 years and is internationally recognized as the biotechnology center of the world. The recent debate over the moral and the ethical issues of stem cell research has hampered the progress of scientific discoveries in this field, especially in the US. The CIRM is a unique institute that fosters ethical stem cell research in California. The CIRM also serves as an exemplary model for similar programs in other states and countries. This grant proposal falls under the mission statement of the CIRM for funding innovative research. The proposal will generate highly innovative and effective therapies for cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis and will explore the potential use of tissue-engineered products from stem cells. If successful, this will further validate the significance of the CIRM program and will help maintain California's leading position at the cutting edge of biomedical research. Reducing the medical and economic burden of large numbers of patients who suffer from arthritis would is of significant benefit.
Progress Report: 
  • Arthritis is the result of degeneration of cartilage (the tissue lining the joints) and leads to pain and limitation of function. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $120 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. The prevalence of arthritic conditions is also expected to increase as the population increases and ages in the coming decades. Current treatment options for osteoarthritis are limited to pain reduction and joint replacement surgery.
  • Stem cells have tremendous potential for treating disease and replacing or regenerating the diseased tissue. In this grant we proposed a series of experiments to develop stems cells for use in arthritis.
  • We have met all the milestones we proposed in the first year of the grant application. We have differentiated embryonic stem cells into cells that can generate cartilage tissue similar to that generated by normal cartilage cells. We have induced pluripotency in adult human cells obtained from skin. Inducing pluripotency means transforming adult cells into cells that function very similar to embryonic stem cells. The advantage of this approach is that it removes the need for embryos as source of cells and greatly reduces the risk of rejection by the patient. We have also induced pluripotency in adult human cells obtained from joint cartilage. We believe that the original source of the cells may make a significant difference in the quality of the tissue being regenerated. For example, pluripotent cells generated from cartilage cells will likely produce a better quality of cartilage tissue than pluripotent cells generated from skin cells.
  • We have established conditions for successful repair of surgical defects using stem cells in laboratory models. We are currently working on an appropriate surgical technique for the in vivo experiments, which will involve implanting these cells in cartilage defects in live animals.
  • We have completed our experiments as outlined in our grant submission, which was the goal to enhance the development of cartilage by testing of various stem cells lines. The next phase of our project will be to prepare for the animal experiments to test the viability of our laboratory experiments that would result in cartilage repair.
  • Our initial application established the goals of our project and the reasons for our study. Arthritis is the result of degeneration of cartilage (the tissue lining the joints) and leads to pain and limitation of function. Arthritis and other rheumatic diseases are among the most common of all health conditions and are the number one cause of disability in the United States. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $120 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. The prevalence of arthritic conditions is also expected to increase as the population increases and ages in the coming decades. Current treatment options for osteoarthritis are limited to pain reduction and joint replacement surgery.
  • Stem cells have tremendous potential for treating disease and replacing or regenerating the diseased tissue. In this project our objective is to use cells derived from stems cells to treat arthritis. We have completed our experiments as per our proposed timeline and have met milestones outlined in our grant submission.
  • We have established conditions for converting stem cells into cartilage tissue cells that can repair bone and cartilage defects in laboratory models. We have identified several cell lines with the highest potential for tissue repair. We optimized culture conditions to generate the highest quality of tissue. In our initial experiments we found no evidence of cell rejection response in animals. We are now in the process of testing efficacy of the three most promising cell lines in regenerating healthy tissue in animals with cartilage defects.
  • In the next phase of our project we will plan safety and efficacy studies for the preclinical phase, identify collaborators with the facilities to obtain, process, and provide cell-based therapies, and identify clinical collaborators in anticipation of clinical trials. If necessary we will also identify commercialization partners.
  • We anticipate that stem cells implanted in arthritic cartilage will treat the arthritis in addition to producing tissue to heal the defect in the cartilage. An approach that heals cartilage defects as well as treats the underlying arthritis would be very valuable. If our research is successful, this could lead to first ever treatment of osteoarthritis with or without stem cells. This treatment would have a huge impact on the large numbers of patients who suffer from arthritis as well as in reducing the economic burden created by arthritis.
  • Our initial application established the goals of our project and the reasons for our study. Arthritis is the result of degeneration of cartilage (the tissue lining the joints) and leads to pain and limitation of function. Arthritis and other rheumatic diseases are among the most common of all health conditions and are the number one cause of disability in the United States. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $120 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. The prevalence of arthritic conditions is also expected to increase as the population increases and ages in the coming decades. Current treatment options for osteoarthritis are limited to pain reduction and joint replacement surgery.
  • Stem cells have tremendous potential for treating disease and replacing or regenerating the diseased tissue. In this project our objective is to use cells derived from stems cells to treat arthritis. We have completed our experiments as per our proposed timeline and have met milestones outlined in our grant submission.
  • We have established conditions for converting stem cells into cartilage tissue cells that can repair bone and cartilage defects in laboratory models. We have identified several cell lines with the highest potential for tissue repair. We optimized culture conditions to generate the highest quality of tissue. In our initial experiments we found no evidence of cell rejection response in animals. We are now in the process of testing efficacy of the three most promising cell lines in regenerating healthy tissue in animals with cartilage defects.
  • In the next phase of our project we will plan safety and efficacy studies for the preclinical phase, identify collaborators with the facilities to obtain, process, and provide cell-based therapies, and identify clinical collaborators in anticipation of clinical trials. If necessary we will also identify commercialization partners.
  • We anticipate that stem cells implanted in arthritic cartilage will treat the arthritis in addition to producing tissue to heal the defect in the cartilage. An approach that heals cartilage defects as well as treats the underlying arthritis would be very valuable. If our research is successful, this could lead to first ever treatment of osteoarthritis with or without stem cells. This treatment would have a huge impact on the large numbers of patients who suffer from arthritis as well as in reducing the economic burden created by arthritis.
  • Our initial application established the goals of our project and the reasons for our study. Arthritis is the result of degeneration of cartilage (the tissue lining the joints) and leads to pain and limitation of function. Arthritis and other rheumatic diseases are among the most common of all health conditions and are the number one cause of disability in the United States. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $120 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. The prevalence of arthritic conditions is also expected to increase as the population increases and ages in the coming decades. Current treatment options for osteoarthritis are limited to pain reduction and joint replacement surgery.
  • Stem cells have tremendous potential for treating disease and replacing or regenerating the diseased tissue. In this project our objective is to use cells derived from stems cells to treat arthritis. We have completed our experiments as per our proposed timeline and have met milestones outlined in our grant submission.
  • We have established conditions for converting stem cells into cartilage tissue cells that can repair bone and cartilage defects in laboratory models. We have identified several cell lines with the highest potential for tissue repair. We optimized culture conditions to generate the highest quality of tissue. In our initial experiments we found no evidence of cell rejection response in vivo. We have testing efficacy of the most promising cell lines in regenerating healthy repair tissue in cartilage defects and have selected a preclinical candidate.
  • The next step is to plan safety and efficacy studies for the preclinical phase, identify collaborators with the facilities to obtain, process, and provide cell-based therapies, and identify clinical collaborators in anticipation of clinical trials. If necessary we will also identify commercialization partners.
  • We also anticipate that stem cells implanted in arthritic cartilage will treat the arthritis in addition to producing tissue to heal the defect in the cartilage. An approach that heals cartilage defects as well as treats the underlying arthritis would be very valuable. If our research is successful, this could lead to first treatment of osteoarthritis that alters the progression of the disease. This treatment would have a huge impact on the large numbers of patients who suffer from arthritis as well as in reducing the significant economic burden created by arthritis.

Promoting survival and countering hypertrophy of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived chondrocytes

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07230
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 146 468
Disease Focus: 
Arthritis
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Degenerative joint disease, also known as osteoarthritis, currently affects more than 20 million people in the USA alone, making articular cartilage restoration one of the major priorities in medicine. Articular chondrocyte progenitors are likely to be present only early in development, which explains why previous attempts to engineer articular cartilage using adult stem cells have been unsuccessful. Recapitulation of the human chondrogenic program using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) may represent a groundbreaking system for cartilage restoration. We hypothesize that regeneration of articular cartilage requires not only generation of structural cartilage cells, but also a supportive “niche” component absent or not fully represented in the adult joint. The overall goal of this research proposal is to dissect the cellular and molecular components of this chondrogenic “niche” essential for the survival, maintenance and expansion of cartilage cells produced from hPSC. The findings from these studies will not only contribute towards our understanding of how articular cartilage is formed during hPSC differentiation, but will also have broad applicability for the production of other types of tissues from hPSC. Most importantly, the ability to control differentiation from hPSC into the articular chondrocyte lineage may provide an unlimited source of matched cells for transplantation in patients with joint cartilage degeneration
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The unique combination of pluripotentiality and an unlimited capacity for proliferation have raised the hope that pluripotent stem cells (PSC) will one day provide an inexhaustible source of tissue for transplantation and regeneration. Degenerative joint cartilage disease, also known as osteoarthritis, is one of the most common chronic diseases among Californians, causing significant pain and loss of mobility and impairing earning capacity. Tens of thousands of Californians go through invasive and expensive total joint replacement surgery every year. This proposal explores the question of what unique molecular signals control the survival and maintenance of cartilage cells (also known as chondrocytes) produced during the differentiation of PSC. The research proposed in this application has broad potential benefits for Californians, both through the biological questions it will answer and the relevance of its findings for clinical translation. The development of a human cell culture system that could expand the number of available articular chondrocytes would provide new opportunities for transplantation for patients with cartilage injury or degenerative arthritis and potentially delay or even prevent these patients from needing joint replacement procedures. All the scientific findings and technical tools developed in this proposal will be made available to researchers throughout California, according to the guidelines of the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine

Gene Targeting to Endogenous Stem Cells for Segmental Bone Fracture Healing

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06713
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 185 487
Disease Focus: 
Arthritis
Bone or Cartilage Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Segmental bone fractures are a complex medical condition. These injuries cause great suffering to patients, long-term hospitalization, repeated surgeries, loss of working days, and considerable costs to the health system. It is well known that bone grafts taken from the patient (autografts) are considered the gold-standard therapy for these bone defects. Yet these grafts are not always available, and their harvest often leads to prolonged pain. Allografts, are "dead" bone grafts, which are readily available from tissue banks, but have very low potential to induce bone repair. We have previously shown that stem cells from human bone marrow, engineered with a bone-forming gene, can lead to complete repair of segmental fractures. However, such an approach requires several steps, which could complicate and prolong the pathway to clinical use. An alternative approach would be to gene-modify stem cells that already reside in the fracture site. We were the first to show, in a rodent model, that a segmental bone defect can be completely repaired by recruitment stem cells to the defect site followed by direct gene delivery. In the proposed project we aim to further promote this approach to clinical studies. The project will include the development of a direct gene delivery technology, based on ultrasound. We will test the efficiency of the method in repairing large bone defects and its safety. If successful, we will be able to proceed to FDA approval towards first-in-human trials.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Segmental bone defects are a complex medical problem that often requires bone grafting. Autografts are considered the gold standard for these defects, but their usage is limited by availability and donor-site morbidity and supply. Allografts are more available but often fail to integrate with the host bone. Thus there is an unmet need in the field of orthopedic medicine for novel therapies for segmental bone fractures. We propose to develop a novel approach for the treatment of such fractures without the need for a bone graft. Specifically, we will utilize ultrasound to deliver a bone-forming gene to stem cells that will be recruited to the defect site. As we have already shown, the gene would trigger the cells to regenerate the bone that had been lost due to trauma or cancer. If successful, this project could lead to the development of a simple treatment for massive bone loss. Such a treatment will benefit the citizens of California by reducing loss of workdays, duration of hospital stays, and operative costs, and by improving quality of life for Californians with complex segmental bone fractures.

Cartilage Regeneration by the Chondrogenic Small Molecule PRO1 during Osteoarthritis

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01829
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 792 660
Disease Focus: 
Arthritis
Bone or Cartilage Disease
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Other
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The ability to direct the differentiation of resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cartilage lineage offers considerable promise for the regeneration of articular cartilage after traumatic joint injury or age-related osteoarthritis (OA). MSCs can be stimulated in vitro to form new functional cartilage. In the OA-affected joint, the repair is insufficient, leaving a damaged matrix, suggesting that key factors are missing to properly direct the regenerative process. Molecules that activate the chondrogenic potential of cartilage stem cells may potentially prevent further cartilage destruction and stimulate repair of cartilage lesions. Currently there are no disease-modifying therapeutics available for the 40 million Americans suffering from OA. Therapeutic options are limited to oral and intra-articularly injected pain medications and joint replacement surgery. The primary objective of this project is to develop a non-invasive, therapeutic for the regeneration of cartilage in OA. This new therapy will target the resident MSCs in the joint, stimulate production of new cartilage matrix, promote repair and thus limit additional joint damage and improve joint pain and function. To provide a proof-of-concept for our strategy, a cell-based screen of a diverse small molecule library led to compounds capable of enhancing the formation of articular cartilage (chondrogenesis) from MSCs in vitro. In secondary assays, molecules were assessed for protection of the existing cartilage against induced tissue damage. Through these approaches, the lead low molecular weight small molecule PRO1 was identified which promotes cartilage differentiation and protects cartilage from damage. PRO1 reproducibly demonstrated in vivo efficacy in two animal models of OA (surgical and enzyme-induced). OA-associated pain was reduced and the architecture of the cartilage was restored. PRO1 therefore appears to activate the regenerative potential of the resident cartilage stem cells.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease and globally the 4th leading cause of Years Lost to Disease (YLD). OA affects over 40 million Americans and the magnitude of the problem is predicted to increase even further with the obesity epidemic and aging of the baby boomer generation. It is estimated that 80% of the population will have radiographic evidence of OA by age 65 years. The annual economic impact of arthritis in the U.S. is estimated at over $100 billion, representing more than 2% of the gross domestic product. OA accounts for 25% of visits to primary care physicians. In 2004 OA patients received 650,000 knee and hip replacements at a cost of $26 billion. Without change in treatment options 1.8 million joint replacements will be performed in 2015. OA is a painful, degenerative type of arthritis; physical activity can become difficult or impossible. Some patients with osteoarthritis are forced to stop working because their condition becomes so limiting. OA can interfere with a patient's ability to even perform routine daily activities, resulting in a decrease in quality of life. The goals of osteoarthritis treatment are to relieve pain and other symptoms, preserve or improve joint function, and reduce physical disability. Current therapeutic options are limited to pain medications and joint replacement for patients with advanced disease. No disease-modifying OA drugs are approved for clinical use. OA is thus a major unmet medical need with a huge clinical and socioeconomic impact and a complete absence of effective therapies. Clearly the development of a new therapeutic that is both symptom and disease modifying would have a significant impact on the well-being of Californians and reduce the negative economic impact on the state resulting from this highly prevalent disease.
Progress Report: 
  • We have carried out a structure-activity relationship study to identify highly potent analogues of kartogenin with chondrogenic and chondroprotective activities. Over 150 analogues were synthesized with structurally diverse elements and assessed for chondrogenic activity (ability to induce mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into cartilage producing chondrocytes) on human and rodent mesenchymal stem cells. A number of highly potent lead compounds were identified which will next be assessed in chondroprotective assays, cell-based selectively and toxicity assays, pharmacokinetic assays and in vivo rodent efficacy models. At the same time a number of assays were developed and used to assess the chondrocyte protective effects, joint retention, and proliferative activity on human chondrocytes of the parent compound, kartogenin. Kartogenin was found to: (1) have long term human and rodent chondrogenic activity; (2) possess chondroprotective activity in bovine chondrocytes (i.e., protects against degradative activities in the joint); (3) minimally induce chondrocytes proliferation (an undesired activity that could lead to fibrotic and immune responses); (4) have good joint retention (compound retained in the intra-articular space at the site of action); and (5) is subject to rapid systemic clearance (a desirable property to minimize systemic adverse effects).
  • We also identified the mechanism by which the compound functions. In contrast to other drugs in development for osteoarthritis, kartogenin does not target extracellular enzymes involved in joint cartilage degradation. Rather it appears to act directly on an endogenous stem cell population and induce chondrocyte formation. The molecule binds selectively to an intracellular protein filamin A, a protein involved in regulating the cell’s cytoskeletal network (structural elements inside the cell). Rather than modulating the interaction of filamin A with other structural proteins, kartogenin blocks its interaction with the protein CBFβ (core binding factor β subunit, a subunit of a transcription complex with the runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) family). The result is an increase in CBFβ levels in the nucleus where it binds and activates transcription of RUNX dependent genes. In particular CBFβ activates RUNX1 dependent transcription of genes that play key roles in chondrogenesis. Thus this molecule acts by a novel mechanism directly and selectively on gene transcription to induce the selective differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes. Importantly molecules that act by this method should complement the activity of drugs in clinical trials aimed at blocking degradative enzymes.
  • We have made excellent progress toward the identification of a preclinical candidate for the treatment of osteoarthritis. A large structure-activity relationship study was carried out with the chemical synthesis of over 250 analogues of the original lead compound. We have identified molecules with improved activity in cell culture and in relevant preclinical in vivo models. Based on these efforts we are synthesizing a final series of molecules which we will profile with respect to in vitro and in vivo chondrogenesis activity, pharmacokinetics and safety. We expect to choose the final preclinical candidate from this series in the third year of the grant.
  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease affecting about 27 million people in the United States, and is the leading cause of chronic disability in the United States. Current therapeutic options are limited to pain or symptom-modifying drugs and joint replacement surgery; no disease-modifying drugs are approved for clinical use. OA is characterized by progressive degeneration of the articular cartilage, resulting from abnormal activation, differentiation and death of cartilage cells. A unique and unexplored therapeutic opportunity exists to induce somatic stem cells to regenerate the damaged tissue and reverse the chronic destructive process. Because limited joints are affected in most OA patients, intra-articular (IA) drug injection is an attractive treatment approach that allows high local drug concentration with limited systemic exposure. Targeting resident stem cells pharmacologically also avoids the risks and costs associated with cell-based approaches.
  • Cartilage contains resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can be differentiated in vitro to form chondrocytes. This observation suggests that intra-articular injection of a small molecule that promotes chondrogenesis in vivo will preserve and regenerate cartilage in OA-affected joints. Using an image-based screen, we identified a drug-like small molecule, kartogenin (KGN), that promotes efficient and selective chondrocyte differentiation from MSCs in vitro. Intra-articular injection of KGN also shows beneficial effects in surgery-induced acute and enzyme-induced chronic cartilage injury models in rodents, as well as positive effects in incapacitance pain models. This project is aimed at the development of new lead compounds with improved biological activity, the demonstration of efficacy of the lead compounds in rodent and dog OA models and the elucidation of the cellular mechanisms underlying the cartilage regeneration activities of KGN and its analogs.
  • Through medicinal chemistry efforts, we have designed and synthesized over 400 analogs of KGN. Using cell culture based assays, we assessed the chondrocyte differentiation activity of these analogs and identified 17 compounds exhibiting improved potency compared to KGN (EC50 < 100 nM). These compounds showed no obvious cytotoxicity at high concentrations (100 μM) when incubated with a variety of cells present in the joints including MSCs, chondrocytes, osteoblasts and synoviocytes. Up to date, we have assessed the efficacy of 7 compounds using a rat OA model (medial meniscal tear). Two of the tested compounds showed significantly improved cartilage repair at the end of the study. At the same time, no adverse effects, such as body weight loss, pain or impaired motor functions, were observed in any compound treated animals. We are currently studying the effects of another 10 analogs using the same OA model, which is expected to conclude within two to three months. Next, we will assess the efficacy of active compounds in a canine OA model (partial meniscectomy using beagles). Furthermore, full rodent pharmacokinetics and non-GLP toxicology studies will be performed for the lead compounds.
  • To study the underlying mechanisms of KGN induced chondrogenesis, we designed and synthesized an affinity probe with biological activities comparable to that of KGN. Through affinity-based methods, we identified protein filamin A (FLNA) as the target of KGN. In MSCs, KGN binds to FLNA and disrupts its interaction with core binding factor β (CBFβ), which leads to the nuclear translocalization of CBFβ, subsequent activation of the RUNX1-CBFβ transcription program and, as a result, chondrocyte differentiation. This mechanism has been confirmed using cell biological methods including RNAi mediated gene silencing and cDNA overexpression of relevant genes such as FLNA, CBFβ and RUNX1. These studies have been published in the journal Science.

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