Cancer

Coding Dimension ID: 
280
Coding Dimension path name: 
Cancer

Trop2 dependent and independent mechanisms of self-renewal in human cancer stem cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06209
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 382 400
Disease Focus: 
Cancer
Prostate Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Progress from our group and others has led to the identification of normal prostate tissue stem cells and the definition of important signaling pathways that regulate their growth and maintenance. Human cancers utilize these same pathways to promote malignancy and drive tumor progression. Our recent studies have uncovered an important regulatory molecule (Trop2) that is expressed on a subset of prostate cancer cells capable of regenerating tumors. Trop2 expression is selected for in advanced disease and predicts poor prognosis for many tumors including prostate, ovarian, pancreatic, breast, gastric and colorectal cancer. We predict that blocking Trop2 and other regulatory signaling pathways will be an effective strategy to prevent disease progression in prostate and other human cancers.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
In 2012 alone in the state of California, an estimated 29,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and almost 3,400 men will die from the disease. The advanced stages of prostate cancer are treated with hormonal therapy which causes significant changes in mood, body weight and composition, impotence and gynecomastia in addition to the pain and suffering from the disease. Our proposed experiments will define new therapeutic targets and combinatorial therapies with the potential to significantly extend life and minimize suffering of men with advanced prostate cancer. Many of the molecules that we are investigating are implicated in a range of tumors, suggesting that our findings may provide benefit to patients suffering from numerous cancers.
Progress Report: 
  • Stem cells are characterized by longevity, self-renewal throughout the lifetime of a tissue or organism and the ability to generate all lineages of a tissue. Pathways involved in stem cell function are commonly dysregulated in cancer. Emerging evidence in leukemias and epithelial cancers suggests that tumors can be maintained by self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs), defined functionally by their ability to regenerate tumors. Delineating mechanisms that regulate self-renewal in human CSCs are essential to design new therapeutic strategies to combat cancer.
  • We have developed an in vivo tissue-regeneration model of primary human prostate cancer and identified two distinct populations of CSCs that can self-renew and serially propagate tumors. Both CSC subsets express the transmembrane protein Trop2. We have previously shown that Trop2 is a marker and a new regulator of stem/progenitor activity in the prostate. Trop2 controls self-renewal, proliferation and tissue hyperplasia through two cleavage products—intracellular domain (ICD) and extracellular domain (ECD) generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). RIP of Trop2 is carried out by TACE metalloprotease and gamma-secretase complex.
  • We have also demonstrated that cleaved Trop2 ICD is found in human prostate cancer but not in the cancer-adjacent benign tissue, suggesting a role for Trop2 cleavage in tumorigenesis. Now we are generating antibodies that will block Trop2 cleavage and activation. Blocking Trop2 signaling will be an effective strategy to prevent disease progression not only in the prostate but also in other epithelial cancers.

Prostaglandin pathway regulation of self-renwal in hematopoietic and leukemia stem cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology IV
Grant Number: 
RB4-06036
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 244 455
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. They are serious causes of illness and death, and are particularly devastating in children and the elderly. Despite substantial advances in treatment of leukemia, a significant proportion of cases are unresponsive to current therapy. Since more aggressive chemotherapy regimens provide only marginal improvements in therapeutic efficacy, we have reached a point of diminishing returns using currently available drugs. Thus, there is an urgent need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. To this end, our studies focus on defining the defects that corrupt the normal growth controls on blood stem cells. The proposed studies build on our discovery of a key enzyme with an unexpected causative role in leukemia. We propose to further characterize its function using various proteomic approaches, and employ a cross-species comparative approach to identify additional pathways unique to cancer stem cell function. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. They result from corruption of the normal controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Despite many attempts to improve treatments with new drug combinations, this approach has reached a point of diminishing returns since intensified chemotherapies contribute only marginal improvement in outcome and are associated with increasing toxicity. The proposed characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.
Progress Report: 
  • Leukemias are cancers of the blood cells that cause serious illness and death in children and adults. Even patients who are successfully cured of their disease often suffer from long-term deleterious health effects of their curative treatment. Thus, there is a need for more targeted, less toxic, and more effective treatments. Our studies focus on the defects and mechanisms that induce leukemia by disrupting the normal growth controls that regulate blood-forming stem cells. Using a comparative genomics approach we have identified genes that are differentially expressed in leukemia stem cells. These genes have been the focus of our studies to establish better biomarkers and treatment targets. One candidate gene codes for an enzyme with a previously unknown, non-canonical causal role in a specific genetic subtype of leukemia caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. To characterize its molecular contributions, we are identifying and characterizing protein partners that may assist and interact with the enzyme in its oncogenic role. Candidate interaction partners have been identified using proteomic techniques, and are being investigated for their possible mechanistic roles in leukemia stem cell functions. Another promising candidate that we identified in the comparative gene expression approach encodes a cell surface protein that is preferentially expressed on leukemia stem cells. We have exploited this cell surface protein as a marker to isolate the rare population of cells in human leukemias with stem cell properties. This technical approach has resulted in the isolation of leukemia stem cell populations that are more highly enriched than those obtained using previous techniques. The highly enriched sub-population of leukemia stem cells has been used for comparative gene expression profiling to define a dataset of genes that are differentially expressed between highly matched populations of leukemia cells that are enriched or depleted of leukemia stem cells. Bioinformatics analysis of the dataset has further suggested specific cellular processes and transcriptional regulatory factors that distinguish human leukemia stem cells caused by abnormalities of the MLL oncogene. These newly identified factors will be studied using in vitro and in vivo assays for their specific contributions to leukemia stem cell function and leukemia pathogenesis. Continued characterization of crucial growth controls that go awry in blood stem cells to cause leukemia will identify new drug targets for more effective and less toxic treatments against these devastating, life-threatening diseases.

Dual targeting of tyrosine kinase and BCL6 signaling for leukemia stem cell eradication

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01816-A
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 607 305
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
Public Abstract: 
Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an “proliferation phase” and a “quiescence phase”. The “proliferation phase” is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in “quiescence phase” divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia. We discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings demonstrate that the "quiescence phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "quiescence phase". In this proposal, we test a novel therapeutic concept eradicate leukemia stem cells: We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases (“proliferation”) and BCL6 (“quiescence”) represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemia represents the most frequent malignancy in children and teenagers and is common in adults as well. Over the past four decades, the development of therapeutic options has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with leukemia reaching 5 year disease-free survival rates of ~70% for children and ~45% for adults. Despite its relatively favorable overall prognosis, leukemia remains one of the leading causes of person-years of life lost in the US (362,000 years in 2006; National Center of Health Statistics), which is attributed to the high incidence of leukemia in children. In 2008, the California Cancer Registry expected 3,655 patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and at total of 2,185 death resulting from fatal leukemia. In addition, ~23,300 Californians lived with leukemia in 2008, which highlights that leukemia remains a frequent and life-threatening disease in the State of California despite substantial clinical progress. Here we propose the development of a fundamentally novel treatment approach for leukemia that is directed at leukemia stem cells. While current treatment approaches effectively diminish the bulk of proliferating leukemia cells, they fail to eradicate the rare leukemia stem cells, which give rise to drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. We propose a dual targeting approach which combines targeted therapy of the leukemia-causing oncogene and the newly discovered leukemia stem cell survival factor BCL6. The power of this new therapy approach will be tested in clinical trials to be started in the State of California.
Progress Report: 
  • Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an "expansion phase" and a "dormancy phase". The "expansion phase" is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "domancy phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia.
  • Progress during Year 1: During the first year of this project, we discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings during year 1 demonstrate that the "dormancy phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "dormancy phase" .
  • In year 1, we have performed screening procedures to identify novel therapeutic BCL6 inhibitors to eradicate leukemia stem cells: We have found that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases ("expansion phase" ) and BCL6 ("dormancy phase") represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease.
  • Goal for years 2-3: Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.

Dual targeting of tyrosine kinase and BCL6 signaling for leukemia stem cell eradication

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01816-B
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 607 305
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Collaborative Funder: 
Germany
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Leukemia is the most frequent form of cancer in children and teenagers, but is also common in adults. Chemotherapy has vastly improved the outcome of leukemia over the past four decades. However, many patients still die because of recurrence of the disease and development of drug-resistance in leukemia cells. In preliminary studies for this proposal we discovered that in most if not all leukemia subtypes, the malignant cells can switch between an “proliferation phase” and a “quiescence phase”. The “proliferation phase” is often driven by oncogenic tyrosine kinases (e. g. FLT3, JAK2, PDGFR, BCR-ABL1, SRC kinases) and is characterized by vigorous proliferation of leukemia cells. In this phase, leukemia cells not only rapidly divide, they are also highly susceptible to undergo programmed cell death and to age prematurely. In contrast, leukemia cells in “quiescence phase” divide only rarely. At the same time, however, leukemia cells in "quiescence phase" are highly drug-resistant. These cells are also called 'leukemia stem cells' because they exhibit a high degree of self-renewal capacity and hence, the ability to initiate leukemia. We discovered that the BCL6 factor is required to maintain leukemia stem cells in this well-protected safe haven. Our findings demonstrate that the "quiescence phase" is strictly dependent on BCL6, which allows them to evade cell death during chemotherapy treatment. Once chemotherapy treatment has ceased, persisting leukemia stem cells give rise to leukemia clones that reenter "proliferation phase" and hence initiate recurrence of the disease. Pharmacological inhibition of BCL6 using inhibitory peptides or blocking molecules leads to selective loss of leukemia stem cells, which can no longer persist in a "quiescence phase". In this proposal, we test a novel therapeutic concept eradicate leukemia stem cells: We propose that dual targeting of oncogenic tyrosine kinases (“proliferation”) and BCL6 (“quiescence”) represents a powerful strategy to eradicate drug-resistant leukemia stem cells and prevent the acquisition of drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. Targeting of BCL6-dependent leukemia stem cells may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse and may limit the duration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in some leukemias, which is currently life-long.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Leukemia represents the most frequent malignancy in children and teenagers and is common in adults as well. Over the past four decades, the development of therapeutic options has greatly improved the prognosis of patients with leukemia reaching 5 year disease-free survival rates of ~70% for children and ~45% for adults. Despite its relatively favorable overall prognosis, leukemia remains one of the leading causes of person-years of life lost in the US (362,000 years in 2006; National Center of Health Statistics), which is attributed to the high incidence of leukemia in children. In 2008, the California Cancer Registry expected 3,655 patients with newly diagnosed leukemia and at total of 2,185 death resulting from fatal leukemia. In addition, ~23,300 Californians lived with leukemia in 2008, which highlights that leukemia remains a frequent and life-threatening disease in the State of California despite substantial clinical progress. Here we propose the development of a fundamentally novel treatment approach for leukemia that is directed at leukemia stem cells. While current treatment approaches effectively diminish the bulk of proliferating leukemia cells, they fail to eradicate the rare leukemia stem cells, which give rise to drug-resistance and recurrence of the disease. We propose a dual targeting approach which combines targeted therapy of the leukemia-causing oncogene and the newly discovered leukemia stem cell survival factor BCL6. The power of this new therapy approach will be tested in clinical trials to be started in the State of California.
Progress Report: 
  • During the past reporting period (months 18-24 of this grant), we have made progress towards all three milestones. Major progress in Milestone 1 was made by identifying 391 compounds in 10 lead classes that will be developed further in a secondary fragment-based screen. While the goal of identifying lead class compounds with BCL6 inhibitory activity has already been met, we propose to run a secondary, fragment-based screen to refine the existing lead compounds and prioritize a small number for cell-based validation in Milestone 2. The success in Milestone 1 was based on computational modeling, HTS of 200,000 compounds and Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD).
  • For Milestone 2, we have successfully established POC analysis tools for validation of the ability of compounds to bind the BCL6 lateral groove and already produced 300 mg of BCL6-BTB domain protein needed for biochemical binding assays. Progress in Milestone 2 is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. In the coming months, we will use crystallographic fragment screening using a subset of our fragment library in addition to SPR and NMR, since crystallographic fragment screens have been shown to yield complimentary hits. For Milestone 3, we have now set up a reliable method to measure disease-modifying activity of BCL6-inhibitory compounds based on a newly generated knockin BCL6 reporter mouse model, in which transcriptional activation of the endogenous BCL6 promoter drives expression of mCherry. This addresses a main caveat of these measurements was that they were strongly influenced by the copy number of lentivector integrations. The BCL6fl/+-mCherry knockin BCL6 reporter system will provide a stable platform to study BCL6-expressing leukemia cells and effects of BCL6 small molecule inhibitors on survival and proliferation on BCL6-dependent leukemia cell populations. This will be a key requirement to measure disease-modifying activity of inhibitory compounds in large-scale assays in Milestone 3. Other requirements (e.g. leukemia xenografts) are already in place. 

Stem cell-based carriers for RCR vector delivery to glioblastoma

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01791
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 370 607
Disease Focus: 
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Adult Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Modified viruses can be used to infect tumor cells and alter the tumor cell to make anti-tumor proteins. Most researchers use virus that can infect and modify the tumor cell it enters, but can not make more of itself to infect additional cells surrounding the original infected cell. This type of virus is called replication-incompetent virus. Use of replication-incompetent virus is considered safe because no additional virus, which potentially could get out of control, is generated inside of the tumor. However such therapies have been shown to have only limited beneficial effects, presumably because too many tumor cells never get infected. Newer approaches investigate the use of replication-competent viruses to achieve highly efficient gene transfer to tumors. A successfully transduced tumor cell itself becomes a virus-producing cell, sustaining further transduction events even after initial administration. We propose here to use a type of replication-competent virus that only infects dividing cells and therefore will infect the rapidly dividing cancer cells but not normal brain cells. The use of replication-competent virus is potentially more risky but is well justified in clinical scenarios involving highly aggressive and rapidly progressing metastatic tumor growth in the brain. To administer therapeutic virus into the brain, the virus is injected right into the center of the tumor. Yet, human brain tumors are often found as diffusely spreading foci in the brain and may be difficult to eliminate by locally-administered replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) vectors alone. In this study we propose to use a type of adult stem cell called a "mesenchymal stem cell" (MSC) as a delivery system for the RCR vectors. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to have natural tumor-homing abilities, and can migrate to tumor foci and penetrate through into the interior of tumor masses. We propose to engineer them into "aircraft carriers" that release tumor-selective viruses, which can then efficiently spread suicide genes from one cancer cell to another in multiple tumor foci in the brain.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This research is based on a solid foundation that combines two innovative technologies for the treatment of primary brain tumors, particularly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) the most malignant form of brain tumor, which afflicts men, women, and children in California and elsewhere. Each of these technologies has been approved separately by FDA for clinical testing in humans: human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) vectors. MSCs have been reported to exhibit a natural ability to migrate to solid tumors and penetrate into the tissue mass. Once inside a tumor, RCR vectors can spread selectively in the cancer cells and their replication can keep up with their uncontrolled proliferation, and their ability to integrate themselves into the cancer cell genome allows them to permanently "seed" tumor cells with therapeutic genes. Here we propose to utilize the natural tumor homing ability of MSCs to deliver RCR vectors into brain tumors. This "virus vs. cancer" strategy takes advantage of the amplification process inherent in the spread of virus from cell to cell, and by using MSCs to initiate the virus infection efficiently in brain tumors, represents an approach that will have the potential to effectively treat this poor prognosis disease. If successful, clinical application of this strategy can be implemented by an "off-the-shelf" mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) primary cell lines that have been pre-characterized for their tumor homing ability and virus production capability, and can be offered to patients without requiring an invasive procedure to harvest their own stem cells. Furthermore, this represents a treatment that could potentially be administered through a needle, thus making it unnecessary for patients to undergo major neurosurgical procedures entailing craniotomy at an advanced medical center. Hence this research could lead to a novel treatment approach that would particularly address the needs of brain tumor patients in California who are underserved due to socioeconomic and geographic constraints, as well as the elderly who are poor-risk for surgical interventions.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this project is to develop clinically translatable methods for engineering human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to serve as tumor-homing cellular carriers that will deliver a replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) vector throughout primary brain tumors (gliomas). RCR vectors expressing a prodrug activator (also known as a "suicide gene"), which converts a non-toxic "pro-drug" compound into a potent chemotherapy drug directly generated within the infected tumor cells, have recently initiated testing in Phase I/II clinical trials for suicide gene therapy of recurrent high-grade gliomas. We are examining whether MSCs can serve as producer cells for this RCR vector, and whether the tumor transduction efficiency and therapeutic efficacy of this vector can be significantly enhanced, without compromising its safety profile, hMSC-based RCR producer cells (MSC-RCR) are used as a tumor-homing mobile carrier system that releases the virus as the cells migrate toward and within tumor masses in the brain. In particular, we are comparing this MSC-RCR cell-based carrier method against conventional delivery methods by direct intratumoral injection of 'naked' virus, in subcutaneous and intracranial brain tumor models.
  • To date, we have accomplished our milestone tasks for Year 1, by:
  • - successfully developing efficient methods to transduce hMSCs with RCR vectors and thereby convert them into vector producer cells
  • - developing and comparing in vitro and in vivo assays to evaluate the tumor-homing migratory activity of hMSCs
  • - applying these assays to screen and evaluate commercially available hMSC isolates
  • - demonstrating that the MSC-RCR delivery system can achieve significantly more efficient transduction of subcutaneous glioma models as compared to virus by itself
  • - confirming that enhanced transduction efficiency by MSC-RCR achieves more rapid tumor growth inhibition, as compared to 'naked' RCR alone, when applied to suicide gene therapy in subcutaneous tumor models of human glioma
  • - confirming that hMSC-mediated RCR delivery does not increase vector biodistribution to normal tissues, nor incur any increased risk of secondary leukemogenesis
  • Interestingly, through these studies we have found considerable variability in tumor-homing migration activity and intratumoral migration activity between hMSC isolates from different sources, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of hMSC-based clinical products. We are continuing to characterize additional hMSC isolates from various tissue sources, and are preparing a manuscript to publish these results.
  • Furthermore, based on our favorable results as described above, indicating the enhanced efficiency of tumor transduction and growth inhibitory effects when suicide gene therapy is delivered by MSC-RCR, as compared to RCR alone, we have fulfilled the success criteria for each of our milestone tasks in Year 1, and are currently proceeding with Year 2 studies.
  • Modified viruses can be used to infect tumor cells and alter the tumor cell to make anti-tumor proteins. We have developed a type of replication-competent virus that efficiently infects rapidly dividing cancer cells, but not normal brain cells. This virus is currently being tested clinically in patients with malignant brain tumors. However, to administer therapeutic virus into the brain, the virus is injected right into the center of the tumor, or in around the margins of the cavity after surgical removal of most of the tumor. Yet, human brain tumors are often found as diffusely spreading foci in the brain and may be difficult to eliminate by locally-administered replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) vectors alone. In this project, we propose to use a type of adult stem cell, called a "mesenchymal stem cell" (MSC), as a delivery system for the RCR vectors. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to have natural tumor-homing abilities, and can migrate to tumor foci and penetrate through into the interior of tumor masses.
  • During this project period, we have established and optimized manufacturing methods to engineer hMSCs into "aircraft carriers" that release our tumor-selective RCR vectors, which we then confirmed can efficiently spread a non-therapeutic marker gene to brain tumor cells. We have further confirmed that the use of hMSCs as a cellular delivery system for RCR vectors achieves more rapid spread of the vectors through the tumor mass, as compared to injecting the virus by itself, both in tumor models implanted under the skin as well as implanted in the brain. We have also obtained initial results demonstrating that hMSC delivery of RCR vectors does not result in unwanted spread of virus to normal tissues outside the brain. This stem cell-based RCR vector delivery system, which we have so far tested and validated using a marker gene, in our current studies is now being applied to delivery of a therapeutic anti-tumor 'suicide' gene. We have also initiated discussions with the UC Davis Stem Cell Institute to develop clinical grade manufacturing processes for hMSC-based RCR vector producer cells, and with a San Diego-based biotech partner, Tocagen Inc., toward the initiation of a clinical trial to test this strategy in brain tumor patients in the near future.

Preclinical development of a pan Bcl2 inhibitor for cancer stem cell directed therapy

Funding Type: 
Early Translational II
Grant Number: 
TR2-01789
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$3 341 758
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Cancer Stem Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Cancer is the leading cause of death for individuals under 85. Relapse and metastatic disease are the leading causes of cancer related mortality. Anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member overexpression has been shown to promote disease progression in both chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and prostate cancer. Andr., the emergence of cancer stem cells (CSC) promotes apoptosis resistance in the bone marrow metastatic microenvironment. While targeted therapy with BCR-ABL inhibitors has improved survival of patients with chronic phase CML, the prevalence has doubled since 2001 with over 22,000 people living with CML in the US in 2009. Unfortunately, a growing proportion of patients become intolerant or simply cannot afford full dose BCR-ABL inhibitor therapy and thus, progress to advanced phase disease with a 5 year survival rate of less than 30%. Although prostate cancer prevalence was high at 2.26 million in 2007, distant disease was relatively rare at 5%. However, like blast crisis CML, metastatic prostate cancer survival was only 30% over 5 years. Overexpression of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (BCL2) family genes has been observed in human blast crisis CML and advanced prostate cancer and may fuel CSC survival. Recent RNA sequencing data demonstrate that human CSC express a panoply of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 isoforms in response to extrinsic signals in vivo, indicating that a pan BCL2 inhibitor will be required to abrogate CSC survival. Through binding and anti-tumor studies, a potent inhibitor of BCL2 pro-survival family proteins, BI-97C1, has been identified which inhibits the binding of BH3 peptides to Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl1-1 with nanomolar IC50 values. Notably, BI-97C1 potently inhibits growth of human prostate cancer in a xenograft model as well as blast crisis CML CSC engrafted in RAG2-/-c-/- mice while exerting minimal cytotoxicity toward bax-/-bak-/- cells. Because BI-97C1 inhibits all six anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members including Bcl-2, Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1), Bcl-XL (BCL2L1), Bfl-1 (BCL-2A1), Bcl-W (BCL2L2) and Bcl-B (BCL2L10) proteins, with improved chemical, plasma and microsomal stability relative to apogossypol, we anticipate that it will have clinical utility for targeting apoptosis resistant human CSC in two malignancies with proven reliance on BCL2 signaling – blast crisis CML and advanced prostate cancer. Thus, anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member inhibition with BI-97C1 could represent a vital component of a potentially curative strategy for advanced malignancies that may obviate the need for costly continuous tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy by increasing sensitivity to therapy. Elimination of CSC contributing to therapeutic resistance, the primary cause of cancer death, is of high clinical importance and thus, development of a small molecule pan-BCL2 inhibitor would fulfill a vital unmet medical need, fuel California biotechnology stem cell R&D efforts and decrease health care costs for patients with cancer.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cancer is the leading cause of death for individuals under 85 and usually results from metastatic disease in the setting of therapeutic recalcitrance. Anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member overexpression has been shown to promote disease progression in both chronic myeloid leukemia and prostate cancer. Moreover, the emergence of quiescent cancer stem cells promotes apoptosis resistance in the bone marrow niche for. While targeted BCR-ABL inhibition has resulted in improved survival of patients with chronic phase CML, the prevalence has doubled since 2001 with over 22,000 people living with CML in the US in 2009 (http://www.leukemia-lymphoma.org). Unfortunately, a growing proportion of patients become intolerant or simply cannot afford full dose BCR-ABL inhibitor therapy as a result of spiraling annual costs and thus, progress to advanced phase disease with a 5 year survival rate of less than 30%. Although prostate cancer prevalence was high at 2.26 million in 2007, distant disease was relatively rare at 5%. Like CML, metastatic prostate cancer survival was only 30% over 5 years (http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/prost.html#prevalence <http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/prost.html#prevalence> ). Like blast crisis CML, prostate cancer progression and metastasis is associated with BCL2 overexpression. Thus, anti-apoptotic BCL2 family member inhibition with BI-97C1 could represent a vital component of a potentially curative strategy for advanced malignancies that may obviate the need for costly continuous tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy by increasing sensitivity to therapy. Elimination of CSC contributing to therapeutic resistance, the primary cause of cancer death, is of high clinical importance and thus, development of a small molecule pan-BCL2 inhibitor would fulfill a vital unmet medical need, fuel California biotechnology stem cell R&D efforts and decrease health care costs for patients with cancer.
Progress Report: 
  • Overexpression of Bcl-2 family genes may fuel CSC survival. Recent RNA sequencing data demonstrate that human CSC express a panoply of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 isoforms in response to extrinsic signals in vivo, indicating that a pan Bcl-2 inhibitor will be required to abrogate CSC survival. Sabutoclax inhibits growth of blast crisis CML CSC engrafted in RAG2-/-c-/- mice with minimal cytotoxicity toward bax-/-bak-/- cells. Because sabutoclax inhibits all six antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-XL, Bfl-1, Bcl-W and Bcl-B proteins, with good chemical, plasma and microsomal stability, we anticipate that it will have clinical utility for targeting apoptosis resistant human CSC in malignancies
  • Significant progress against milestones in the first year was accomplished and we have made early progress on several milestones projected for Year 2. During this 6 month reporting period, sabutoclax was licensed by a biotech company, Oncothyreon. The license was previously held by Coronado Biosciences. Dr. Pellecchia (SBMRI ) continues to provide sabutoclax to Dr. Jamieson for use in cellular and in vivo studies. SBMRI conducted QC analyses (integrity and purity) on samples’ used in preclinical studies and provided comparative analyses of compound produced by the CMO produced by different methods of synthesis. Importantly, the sabutoclax manufacturing process was optimized allowing scale-up of drug. In formulation studies, a method was developed and qualified that separates impurities and degradation compounds from sabutoclax for quantitation of the drug. Additional solubility and stability studies were performed by Oncothyreon to identify an IV formulation that could be used for both nonclinical studies and the clinic. Several pilot PK studies in mice, rats and dogs, planned for Year 2, were also conducted by Oncothyreon. Through whole transcriptome RNA sequencing Dr. Jamieson showed that Bcl-W was up-regulated in CP and BC progenitors compared to normal CB progenitors. Previous qRT-PCR results for Mcl-1 were confirmed, showing that the long isoform was preferentially expressed in BC CML. Results for Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were also confirmed at the protein level by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry of bone marrow (BM) from mice engrafted with human CML CD34+ LSC.
  • Sabutoclax treatment ablated BC CML progenitor cells in vivo and in vitro. Colony formation of BC CML (vs normal progenitor cells) was decreased by sabutoclax in a dose dependent manner. When CML cells were co-cultured with stromal cells or in stroma conditioned media, BCL-2 mRNA expression was increased and colony formation was improved. Knockdown of endogenous BCL2 in BC CML cells by shRNA resulted in decreased colony formation. Preliminary results suggest that BM is a protective niche for BC CML CSC and that sabutoclax may target these niche protected cells.
  • In BC CML engrafted mice, dasatinib increased quiescent BC CML cell engraftment in mouse BM measured by FACS for cell cycle markers. Sabutoclax decreased BCL-2 and MCL1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry staining and decreased quiescent BC CML CSC in BM however sabutoclax increased TUNEL staining in BM suggesting that while dasatinib may increase the number of quiescent BC CML CSC, sabutoclax may do the reverse.
  • High doses of sabutoclax administered in combination with dasatinib resulted in a significant decrease in human cell engraftment in BM versus dasatinib alone. Mice serially transplanted with tissues from combination treated mice had increased survival compared to serial transplants of single agent treated tissues. Human CD34+ cells from the BM of combination treated mice had more cells in cycle than CD34+ cells compared to the BM of mice treated with dasatinib alone. The frequency of CD34+BCL2+ and CD34+MCL1+ BC LSC were significantly lower in BM treated with a combination of sabutoclax and dasatinib suggesting that sabutoclax and dasatinib may act synergistically to increase survival of BC CML engrafted mice.
  • Dormant cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to therapeutic resistance and relapse in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and other recalcitrant malignancies. Cumulative data demonstrate that overexpression of BCL2 family pro-survival splice isoforms fuels quiescent CSC survival in human blast crisis (BC) CML. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing data, apoptosis PCR array and splice isoform specific qRT-PCR demonstrate that human CSC express anti-apoptotic long BCL2 isoforms in response to extrinsic signals in the marrow niche, indicating that a pan BCL2 inhibitor will be required to abrogate CSC survival. Sabutoclax, a novel pan BCL2 inhibitor, prevents survival of BC CSC engrafted in RAG2-/-c-/- mice, commensurate with downregulation of pro-survival BCL2 splice isoforms and proteins, and sensitizes CSC to a BCR-ABL inhibitor, dasatinib, while exerting minimal cytotoxicity toward normal hematopoietic stem cells. Because sabutoclax inhibits all six anti-apoptotic BCL2 family members, with good chemical, plasma and microsomal stability, in addition to a scaleable production process, we anticipate that it will have broad clinical utility for targeting apoptosis resistant quiescent human CSC in a number of recalcitrant malignancies as featured in our recent lead article (Goff D et al, Cell Stem Cell. 2013 Mar 7;12(3):316-28).
  • Significant progress against milestones in the second year was accomplished and we have made early progress on several milestones projected for Year 3. Whole transcriptome RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR array and splice isoform specific qRT-PCR analysis performed on FACS purified progenitors derived from 8 CP, 8 BC and 6 normal samples demonstrated splice isoform switching favoring pro-survival long isoform expression during progression from CP to blast BC CML and in CSC engrafted in the bone marrow (BM) niche. Both human BCL2 and MCL1 protein expression co-localized with engrafted human leukemic CD34+ cells in the bone marrow epiphysis and served as important biomarkers of response to sabutoclax. Importantly, intravenous treatment with sabutoclax reduced BC CML CSC survival in both marrow and splenic niches at doses that spared normal hematopoietic stem cells in RAG2-/-gamma c-/- xenograft models established with cord blood CD34+ cells.
  • While dasatinib treatment alone increased serially transplantable quiescent BC CML CSC in BM, sabutoclax decreased CSC survival commensurate with upregulation of short pro-apoptotic and downregulation of long anti-apopoptotic BCL2 family isoforms. While previous studies involved intraperitoneal administration, in the last 12 months we have focused on a more clinically relevant intravenous (IV) administration schedule with IV sabutoclax administered alone or in combination with oral dasatinib. In these studies, sabutoclax sensitized quiescent CSC to dasatinib resulting in a significant decrease in CSC survival versus dasatinib alone. Moreover, mice serially transplanted with human cells from combination treated mice had increased survival compared to serial transplants of single agent treated tissues. Human CD34+ cells from the BM of combination treated mice had more cells in cycle than CD34+ cells compared to the BM of mice treated with dasatinib alone. The frequency of CD34+BCL2+ and CD34+MCL1+ BC CSC were significantly lower in BM treated with a combination of sabutoclax and dasatinib suggesting that the combination acts synergistically to decrease CSC survival and increase the lifespan of CSC engrafted mice.
  • During this 12-month reporting period, sabutoclax production was successfully scaled up by two separate CMOs, Syncom and Norac. Dr. Pellecchia (SBMRI) provided flash chromatography purified sabutoclax to Dr. Jamieson for use in cellular and in vivo studies in addition to conducting QC analyses (integrity and purity) on scaled up sabutoclax formulations produced by Norac (4g) and Syncom (30g) in different vehicles. In formulation studies, a flash chromatography method was developed and qualified that separates impurities and degradation compounds from sabutoclax. Additional solubility and stability studies were performed to identify an IV Solutol formulation, compared with the previous IP DMSO/PBS Tween formulation, which could be used for both pre-clinical studies and in future clinical trials. Pilot PK studies in mice and rats were conducted with the Solutol formulated sabutoclax and showed weight loss associated with impurities that could be readily removed by standard flash chromatography. As a result, ssabutoclax production will include flash chromatography to enhance purity and stability and this material will be used for further PK and PD studies. In conclusion, we are on track to accomplish our milestones as set forth in the grant and anticipate that sabutoclax will form the basis of combination clinical studies aimed at eradicating quiescent CSC in a broad array of refractory malignancies.
  • Recent cancer stem cell research performed by ourselves and others has bolstered interest in BCL2 family member expression and inhibition in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and breast cancer (Goff DJ et al Cell Stem Cell 2013; Lagadinou ED et al Cell Stem Cell 2013; Vaillant F et al Cancer Cell 2013). Overexpression of pro-survival BCL2 family genes has been linked to therapeutic resistance driven by dormant, self-renewing CSC. Thus, the BCL2 family represents an attractive therapeutic target that may provide the potential to reduce relapse rates. Because of the greater proclivity for alternative splicing in humans compared with mice, our CIRM ETll funded research has focused on whole transcriptome RNA sequencing, splice isoform specific qRT-PCR and BCL2 PCR array analysis of FACS-purified CSC from patients with CML and CSC derived from human blast crisis CML engrafted RAG2-/-gc-/- mouse models.
  • A Pan-BCL2 inhibitor renders bone-marrow-resident human leukemia stem cells sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Cell Stem Cell. 2013 Mar 7;12(3):316-28) was featured in a lead article in Cell Stem Cell in March. This study also led to a number of disclosures relating to unique self-renewal and survival gene splice isoform based CSC detection and patient prognostication strategies. As a result, pan BCL2 targeting has generated considerable interest from academic and pharmaceutical investigators who would like to adopt the approach of dormant CSC sensitization to agents that target dividing cells, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

Forming the Hematopoietic Niche from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology III
Grant Number: 
RB3-05217
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 375 983
Disease Focus: 
Blood Cancer
Cancer
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine will be realized only when the process by which tissues are generated from these cells is significantly more efficient and controlled than is currently the case. Fundamental questions remain about the mechanisms by which pluripotent stem cells differentiate into mature tissue. The overall goal of this research proposal is to discover if the cell types produced during differentiation of PSC produce the microenvironment needed for specialized tissue stem cells to develop. To approach this question we will use the hematopoietic (“blood-forming”) system as our model, as it is the best characterized tissue in terms of differentiation pathways and offers a range of unique technical tools with which to rigorously study questions of differentiation. Adult hematopoietic stem cells survive and grow in the bone marrow only if they are physically close to specialized cell types, the so-called hematopoietic stem cell “niche”. We hypothesize that hematopoietic stem cells are not produced from pluripotent cells because the cells that form the niche and provide the necessary signals are not present during this early stage of differentiation. Our research proposal has three specific aims. The first aim is to determine if a single cell type derived from pluripotent cells can generate both blood cells and the cells of the hematopoietic niche. The second aim is to identify the types of niche cells produced from pluripotent cells and define how each of them affect the growth of adult stem cells. In the third aim, the cell types that are found in aim 2 to best support adult hematopoiesis, will then be tested for their ability to promote the production of hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells. The findings from these studies will have broad applicability to the production of other types of tissues from pluripotent stem cells, all of which have stem cells that require interaction with a specialized niche. In addition to the biological questions explored in this proposal, our focus on the blood system has direct clinical relevance to the field of bone marrow and cord blood transplantation. The development of a human hematopoietic niche from pluripotent stem cells could potentially be used to expand hematopoietic stem cells from adult tissues like cord blood. Most importantly, the ability to control differentiation from pluripotent stem cells into the blood lineage could provide an unlimited source of matched cells for transplantation for patients with leukemia and other diseases of the bone marrow and the immune system who currently lack suitable donors.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The unique combination of pluripotentiality and unlimited capacity for proliferation has raised the hope that pluripotent stem cells will one day provide an inexhaustible source of tissue for transplantation and regeneration. Diseases that might be treated from such tissues affect millions of Californians and their families. However, much is still to be learned about the mechanisms by which pluripotent stem cells differentiate into mature tissue. The clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine will be realized only when the process by which tissues are generated from these cells is significantly more efficient and better controlled than is currently the case. The research proposed in this application has broad potential benefits for Californians both through the biological questions it will answer and the relevance of these studies for clinical translation. Our goal is to understand the way the microenvironment influences tissue production from pluripotent stem cells, a critical issue for the field of stem cell biology. Specifically we will explore the question- Do the cell types produced during differentiation of pluripotent stem cells produce an adequate microenvironment for the differentiation of tissue or are some cells inhibitory to tissue production? Our approach to these questions will be to use the hematopoietic (“blood-forming”) system as our model, as it is the best characterized tissue in terms of differentiation and offers a range of unique technical tools with which to study these questions rigorously. However, the fundamental concepts formed from these studies will have great relevance for the clinical production of other types of tissues from pluripotent stem cells, such as islets, neural cells and cardiac muscle. In addition to the broad biological questions explored in this proposal, our focus on the blood system has direct clinical relevance to the field of bone marrow and cord blood transplantation. One goal in the proposal is to generate a cellular platform from pluripotent stem cells that will create an environment in which adult blood stem cells can grow and be expanded. Cell numbers collected from cord blood at birth are often insufficient for transplantation in adult patients and older children. The development of a human cell culture system that could expand the number of cord blood stem cells would provide new opportunities for transplantation for patients with leukemia and other diseases of the bone marrow and the immune system who currently lack suitable donors. All scientific findings and technical tools developed in this proposal will be made available to researchers throughout California, under the guidelines from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine.
Progress Report: 
  • The clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine will be realized only when the process by which tissues are generated from these cells is significantly more efficient and controlled than is currently the case. Fundamental questions remain about the mechanisms by which pluripotent stem cells differentiate into mature tissue. The overall goal of this research proposal is to discover if the cell types produced during differentiation of PSC produce the microenvironment needed for specialized tissue stem cells to develop.
  • To approach this question we use the hematopoietic (“blood-forming”) system as our model, as it is the best characterized tissue in terms of differentiation pathways and offers a range of unique technical tools with which to rigorously study questions of differentiation. Adult hematopoietic stem cells survive and grow in the bone marrow only if they are physically close to specialized cell types, the so-called hematopoietic stem cell “niche”. We hypothesize that hematopoietic stem cells are not produced from pluripotent cells because the cells that form the niche and provide the necessary signals are not present during this early stage of differentiation.
  • Our research proposal has three specific aims. The first aim is to determine if a single cell type derived from pluripotent cells can generate both blood cells and the cells of the hematopoietic niche. The second aim is to identify the types of niche cells produced from pluripotent cells and define how each of them affect the growth of adult stem cells. In the third aim, the cell types that are found in aim 2 to best support adult hematopoiesis, will then be tested for their ability to promote the production of hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells.
  • During the first year of support, we have made significant progress in the first two specific aims. We have developed a method that allows us to track the common origin of the blood forming cells and their microenvironment. We also have identified subsets of cells generated from pluripotent cells that have distinct functions in blood formation. Our plan during the next year is to fully characterize these subsets to understand how they function, and to improve our methods to expand them in culture.
  • The clinical potential of pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine will be realized only when the process by which tissues are generated from these cells is significantly more efficient and controlled than is currently the case. Fundamental questions remain about the mechanisms by which pluripotent stem cells differentiate into mature tissue. The overall goal of this research proposal is to discover if the cell types produced during differentiation of PSC produce the microenvironment needed for specialized tissue stem cells to develop.
  • To approach this question we use the hematopoietic (“blood-forming”) system as our model, as it is the best characterized tissue in terms of differentiation pathways and offers a range of unique technical tools with which to rigorously study questions of differentiation. Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) survive and grow in the bone marrow only if they are physically close to specialized cell types, the so-called hematopoietic stem cell “niche”. We hypothesize that hematopoietic stem cells are not produced from pluripotent cells because the cells that form the niche and provide the necessary signals are not present during this early stage of differentiation.
  • Our research proposal has three specific aims. The first aim is to determine if a single cell type derived from pluripotent cells can generate both blood cells and the cells of the hematopoietic niche. The second aim is to identify the types of niche cells produced from pluripotent cells and define how each of them affect the growth of adult stem cells. In the third aim, the cell types that are found in aim 2 to best support adult hematopoiesis, will then be tested for their ability to promote the production of hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells.
  • During the second year of support, we have made significant progress in all three specific aims. We continue to refine our method that allows us to track the common origin of the blood forming cells and their microenvironment during development. We have identified subsets of cells generated from pluripotent cells that can support cord blood HSC and now we are determining the mechanisms by which these cells act and how they can be best used to support HSC that develop from PSC.

The role of neural stem cells in cerebellar development, regeneration and tumorigenesis

Funding Type: 
Research Leadership 1
Grant Number: 
LA1-01747
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$5 919 616
Disease Focus: 
Brain Cancer
Cancer
Cell Line Generation: 
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Stem cells have the remarkable ability to renew themselves and to generate multiple different cell types. This allows them to generate normal tissues during development and to repair tissues following injury, but at the same time, renders them highly susceptible to mutations that can result in cancer. Only by understanding the signals that control growth and differentiation of stem cells can we learn to harness their regenerative capacity and restrain their malignant potential. The research described in this proposal is aimed at elucidating the role of neural stem cells in development, regeneration and tumor formation in the cerebellum. Our previous studies identified a population of neural stem cells in the developing cerebellum. We now propose to use genetic approaches to mark these cells and identify the cell types that they generate during normal development. In addition, we plan to examine the capacity of these cells to regenerate the cerebellum following radiation. Finally, we propose to study the ability of these cells to give rise to brain tumors, and use the models that result from these studies to develop and test novel approaches to therapy. These studies will pave the way towards use of stem cells for repair of neurological damage and help develop more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
We have previously identified a novel population of neural stem cells in the cerebellum. This proposal is focused on understanding the role of these cells in normal development, regeneration and tumor formation. It has the potential to benefit California in a number of important ways. 1. Treatment of Brain Damage: Radiation is the most commonly used treatment for brain tumors, and children who receive this treatment often suffer severe side effects, including a progressive loss of intellectual function. By studying the ability of cerebellar stem cells to repair brain tissue, we will advance the treatment of patients suffering from brain damage due to radiation therapy. The knowledge we gain may also be more broadly applicable, advancing the use of stem cells to repair damage due to congenital brain disorders, trauma and stroke. 2. Treatment of Brain Tumors: Medulloblastoma and astrocytoma are the most common brain tumors in children. By examining the role of stem cells in development of these tumors, we will deepen our understanding of how brain tumors form, and develop novel approaches to treating them. Moreover, we will create new model systems that can be used to test these therapies, with the hope of moving the most effective ones forward towards trials in patients. 3. Technology: Our research will culminate in the invention and generation of new drugs and approaches to therapy that will be made available for licensing by the academic institutions in California, such as {REDACTED} and its collaborators, and developed by pharmaceutical companies based in the State. 4. Collaboration: Our work is multidisciplinary and translational in nature. As such, it will require collaboration with other investigators, including stem cell biologists, neurobiologists, cancer biologists and chemists involved in experimental therapeutics. Once discoveries are made that may be of benefit to patients, we will also work with clinicians to move these discoveries towards the clinic. Californians will be the likely first beneficiaries of these therapies because the clinical trials will be conducted here and we will make an effort to make sure that Californians have immediate access to these therapies when they become standard. By bringing together investigators from various fields and focusing their attention on clinically relevant problems, our studies will advance the translational potential of stem cell research in California.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of our studies is to determine the role of neural stem cells in the development, regeneration and tumor formation in the cerebellum. By understanding the role of stem cells, we hope to learn to use them for repair of neurological damage and to develop more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors.
  • The aims of our studies are: (1) To identify the cell types generated by cerebellar stem cells during normal development; (2) To determine the capacity of cerebellar stem cells to repair damage caused by radiation or disease; and (3) To determine whether cerebellar stem cells can give rise to the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma.
  • We have made significant progress toward our goals over the last year. In particular, we have identified genetic markers that allow us to trace the fate of cerebellar stem cells during normal development. In addition, we have demonstrated that cerebellar stem cells carrying cancer-causing genes can give rise to medulloblastoma. Importantly, this finding has allowed us to create stem cell-based models of medulloblastoma that can be used to test drugs that may be useful for treating the disease. Over the next few years, we hope to use this information to develop more effective therapies for children suffering from medulloblastoma.
  • The goal of our studies is to determine the role of neural stem cells in the development, regeneration and tumor formation in the cerebellum. By understanding the role of stem cells, we hope to learn to use them for repair of neurological damage and to develop more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors.
  • The aims of our studies are: (1) To identify the cell types generated by cerebellar stem cells during normal development; (2) To determine the capacity of cerebellar stem cells to repair damage caused by radiation or disease; and (3) To determine whether cerebellar stem cells can give rise to the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma.
  • We have made significant progress toward our goals over the last year. In particular, we have identified genetic markers that allow us to trace the fate of cerebellar stem cells during normal development. In addition, we have demonstrated that cerebellar stem cells carrying cancer-causing genes can give rise to medulloblastoma. Importantly, this finding has allowed us to create stem cell-based models of medulloblastoma that can be used to test drugs that may be useful for treating the disease. Our screening efforts over the past year have begun to identify compounds that inhibit the growth of human medulloblastoma tumor cells. Over the next few years, we hope to use this information to develop more effective therapies for children suffering from medulloblastoma.
  • The goal of our studies is to determine the role of neural stem cells in development, regeneration, and tumor formation in the cerebellum. By understanding the role of stem cells, we hope to learn to use them for repair of neurological damage and to develop more effective treatments for patients with brain tumors.
  • We have made significant progress towards our goals during the past year. We have identified new drugs that potently inhibit the growth of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. This work could lead to development of new, more effective therapies for medulloblastoma in patients. In addition, we have developed new models for several types of brain tumors, including one that resembles the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and several that model choroid plexus tumors. These models are valuable resources for studying the biology and therapeutic responsiveness of these diseases. Over the next few years, we will continue in our efforts to develop more effective therapies for children suffering from aggressive brain tumors.

Stem Cells in Lung Cancer

Funding Type: 
New Faculty II
Grant Number: 
RN2-00904
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 381 572
Disease Focus: 
Lung Cancer
Cancer
Respiratory Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Adult Stem Cell
Cancer Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Lung cancer is the most deadly cancer worldwide and accounts for more deaths than prostate cancer, breast cancer and colon cancer combined. Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 85% of all lung cancers. The current 5-year survival rate for all stages of NSCLC is only 15%. Although early stage lung cancer has a much better survival rate. Current therapeutic strategies of chemotherapy, radiation therapy and trials with new targeted therapies have only demonstrated, at best, extension in survival by a few months. Clearly, a novel approach is required to develop new therapies for this devastating disease and to detect the disease at an early stage. Cancer stem cells have been identified as the initial cell in the formation of carcinomas. Chemotherapy, radiation and even targeted therapies are all designed to eliminate dividing cells. However, cancer stem cells “hide out” in the quiescent phase of growth. This provides an explanation as to why our cancer therapies may produce an initial response but are often unsuccessful in curing patients. Lung cancer develops through a series of step wise changes that result in the progression of pre-malignant lesions to invasive lung cancer. The mechanisms of how lung cancer develops are not known and if we can prevent the formation of pre-malignant lesions, we will likely be able to prevent lung cancer. We have discovered a subpopulation of stem cells that circulates in the blood and is essential for normal lung repair. Blocking these cells from entering the lung results in a pre-malignant condition in the lungs. We have also identified a subpopulation of stem cells in the lung that is responsible for generating pre-malignant lung cancer lesions. We hypothesize that the interaction between the stem cells in the blood and the stem cells in the lung are critical to prevent lung cancer. We plan to use cutting edge technologies to characterize these different stem cell populations in the lung, and determine how they form pre-malignant lung cancer lesions. We also plan to use preclinical models to try to prevent lung cancer by giving additional stem cells derived from the blood as a therapy. Lastly, we plan to determine whether levels of stem cells in the blood in patients may be used as a blood test to measure the chance of recurrence of lung cancer after therapy. The long term goals of our work are to develop a screening test for lung cancer stem cells that can predict which patients are at high risk for developing lung cancer in order to diagnose lung cancer at an early stage, and to potentially develop a new stem cell based therapy for preventing and treating lung cancer.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
According to the Center for Health Statistics, California Department of Health Services, 13,427 people died of lung cancer in the state of California in 2005. This is more than the deaths attributed to breast, prostate and colon cancers combined. The devastating effects of this disease on the citizens of California and the health care costs involved are enormous. Most cases of lung cancer occur in smokers, but non smokers, people exposed to second hand smoke and ex-smokers are also at risk. In addition, of special concern to California residents, is that exposure to air pollution is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Current therapeutic strategies for lung cancer are in general only able to prolong survival by a few months, especially for late stage disease. One reason for this may be that the cancer initiating stem cell is resistant to these therapies. Understanding the stem cell populations involved in repair of the lung and how these cells may give rise to lung cancer is important for potentially generating new therapeutic targets for lung cancer. We propose to study the stem cell populations of the lung that are crucial for normal airway repair and characterize the putative cancer initiating stem cell in the lung. We have also found stem cells in the blood that are critical for normal airway repair and we plan to test their role in the prevention of premalignant lung cancer lesions. We also plan to test whether levels of these stem cells in the blood may be used as a biomarker of lung cancer. Ultimately, the ability to perform a screening test to detect lung cancer at an early stage, and the development of new therapies for lung cancer will be of major benefit to the citizens of California.
Progress Report: 
  • We identified a putative tumor-initiating stem/progenitor cell that goes rise to smoking-associated non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined 399 NSCLC samples for this tumor-initiating stem/progenitor cell and found that the presence of this cell in the tumor gave rise to a significantly worse prognosis and was associated with metastatic disease. This stem/progenitor cell is known to be important for repair of the airway and is present in precancerous lesions. We believe that this cell undergoes aberrant repair after smoking injury, which leads to lung cancer. We are currently trying to identify the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms involved in this aberrant repair as a means to identify a novel therapy to prevent the development of lung cancer. The presence of these stem/progenitor cells may also be used as a biomarker of poor prognostic NSCLC even in early stage disease.
  • We have identified markers on these stem/progenitor tumor-initiating cells and identified sub-populations of these cells. We are now determining the stem cell capabilities of each of these sub-populations. We are using a model of the development of lung cancer to determine if giving a stem/progenitor cell sub-population for repair can prevent NSCLC from developing.
  • We examined the blood of patients diagnosed with a lung nodule for circulating epithelial stem/progenitor cells. We found that the presence of these cells in the blood of patients predicted the presence of a subtype of NSCLC as compared to a benign lung nodule. We are currently obtaining many more blood samples from patients to further determine whether circulating epithelial stem/progenitor cells could be used as a biomarker of early NSCLC.
  • We have found a stem cell that is important for lung repair after injury that is located in a protected niche in the airway. After repeated injury, for example in smokers, these stem cells persist in an abnormal location on the surface of the airway and replicate and form precancerous areas in the lung. The presence of these stem cells in lung cancer tumors was associated with a poor prognosis with an increased chance of relapse and metastasis.This was especially true in current and former smokers. We therefore believe we have found a putative stem cell that is a tumor initiating cell for lung cancer. We developed a method to isolate these lung stem cells and to profile these cells and developed in vitro and in vivo models to assess their stem cell properties. Finally, we examined human blood samples to assess levels of surrogate markers of these stem cells to assess whether we could use this as a biomarker to predict the presence or absence of lung cancer in patients with a lung nodule.
  • We found a stem cell that is important for lung repair after injury that we believe may form precancerous areas in the lung. We are characterizing these stem cells and identifying pathways involved in normal repair and aberrant repair that leads to lung cancer. We are also isolating this stem cell population and other cell populations from the airway and inducing genetic changes to determine the tumor initiating cell/s for lung cancer. We are also examining the effect the environment may have on the regulation of genes in these stem cells, in precancerous areas and in lung cancers. Finally, we are examining human blood samples to assess levels of surrogate markers of these stem cells to assess whether we could use this as a biomarker to predict the presence or absence of lung cancer in patients with a lung nodule.
  • During this period of funding we discovered a method to reproducibly recover stem cells from human airways and grow them in a dish into mature airway cells. We also discovered the role that certain metabolic cell processes play in regulating the repair after airway injury. We believe that an inability to shut off these processes leads to abnormal repair and lung cancer and are actively investigating this. We are also determining whether the stem cells we isolate from the airways are the stem cells for lung cancer and how they might give rise to lung cancer.
  • In the last year of funding we identified a novel mechanism that tightly controls airway stem cell proliferation for repair after injury. We found that perturbing this pathway results in precancerous lesions that can ultimately lead to lung cancer. Correcting the abnormalities in this pathway that are seen in smokers could allow the development of targeted chemoprevention strategies to prevent the development of precancerous lesions and therefore lung cancer in at risk populations. We also continued our work on trying to identify a cell of origin for squamous lung cancer and identifying the critical drive mutations that are required for squamous lung cancer to develop.

Generation of clinical grade human iPS cells

Funding Type: 
New Cell Lines
Grant Number: 
RL1-00681
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 382 400
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Melanoma
Cancer
Muscular Dystrophy
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
The therapeutic use of stem cells depends on the availability of pluripotent cells that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank safe and well-characterized patient-specific pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. Importantly, the generation of these cells does not require human embryos or human eggs. Since these cells can be derived directly from patients, they will be genetically identical to the patient, and cannot be rejected by the immune system. This concept opens the door to the generation of patient-specific stem cell lines with unlimited differentiation potential. While the current iPS cell technology enables us now to generate patient-specific stem cells, this technology has not yet been applied to derive disease-specific human stem cell lines for laboratory study. Importantly, these new cells are also not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine. For example, the current method to make these cells uses retroviruses and genes that could generate tumors or other undesirable mutations in cells derived from iPS cells. Thus, in this proposal, we aim to improve the iPS cell reprogramming method, to make these cells safer for future use in transplant medicine. We will also generate a large number of iPS lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds, to allow us to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various diseases. Lastly, we will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Several groups, including ours have recently shown that adult skin cells can be reprogrammed in the laboratory to create new cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. These new cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells should have, similar to embryonic stem cells, the potential to develop into any cell type or tissue type in the body. This new technology holds great promise for patient-specific stem-cell based therapies, the production of in vitro models for human disease, and is thought to provide the opportunity to perform experiments in human cells that were not previously possible, such as screening for compounds that inhibit or reverse disease progression. The advantage of using iPS cells for transplantation medicine would be that the patient’s own cells would be reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell state and therefore, when transplanted back into the patient, the cells would not be attacked and destroyed by the body's immune system. Importantly, these new cells are not yet suitable for use in transplantation medicine or studies of human diseases, as their derivation results in permanent genetic changes, and their differentiation potential has not been fully studied. The goal of this proposal is to develop and bank genetically unmodified and well-characterized iPS cell lines of different genetic or disease backgrounds that can be used to characterize these cells for function and as targets to study new therapeutic approaches for various human diseases. We will establish protocols that would allow the preparation of these types of cells for clinical use by physicians investigating new stem cell-based therapies in a wide variety of diseases. Taken together, this would be beneficial to the people of California as tens of millions of Americans suffer from diseases and injuries that could benefit from such research. Californians will also benefit greatly as these studies should speed the transition of iPS cells to clinical use, allowing faster development of stem cell-based therapies.
Progress Report: 
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases, and that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. To that end, we proposed to establish protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that would be compatible with Good Manufacturing Processes (GMP) standards. To establish baseline characteristics of hiPSCs, we performed a complete molecular characterization of all existing hiPSCs in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We found that all hiPSC lines created to date, regardless of the method by which they were reprogrammed, shared a common gene expression signature, distinct from that of hESCs. The functional role of this gene expression signature is still unclear, but any lines that are generated under the guise of this grant will be subjected to a similar analysis to set the framework by which these new lines are functionally characterized. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe iPS cells have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques, all of which are safer than the standard retroviral protocol. We are currently expanding many of the hiPSCs lines generated and will soon demonstrate whether their gene expression profile, differentiation capability, and genomic stability make them suitable for banking in our iPSC core facility. Once fully characterized, these cells will be available from our bank for other investigators.
  • For hiPSC technology to be useful clinically, the procedures to derive these cells must be robust enough that iPSC can be obtained from the majority of donors. To determine the versatility of generation of iPS cells, we have now derived hiPSCs from commercially obtained fibroblasts derived from people of different ages (newborn through 66 years old) as well as from different races (Caucasian and mixed race). We are currently evaluating medium preparations that will be suitable for GMP-level use. Future work will ascertain the best current system for obtaining hiPSC, and establish GMP-compliant methodologies.
  • The goal of this project is to develop and bank safe, well-characterized pluripotent stem cell lines that can be used to study and potentially ameliorate human diseases. To speed this process, we are taking approaches that are not limited by technical, ethical or immunological considerations. We are establishing protocols for generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) that would not involve viral vector integration, and that are compatible with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) standards. Our efforts to develop new strategies for the production of safe hiPSC have yielded many new cell lines generated by various techniques. We are characterizing these lines molecularly, and have found hiPSCs can be made that are nearly indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). We have also recently found in all the hiPSCs generated from female fibroblasts, none reactivated the X chromosome. This finding has opened a new frontier in the study and potential treatment of X-linked diseases. We are currently optimizing protocols to generate hiPSC lines that are derived, reprogrammed and differentiated in the absence of animal cell products, and preparing detailed standard operating procedures that will ready this technology for clinical utility.
  • This project was designed to generate protocols whereby human induced pluripotent stem cells could be generated in a manner consistent with use in clinical trials. This required optimization of protocols and generation of standard operating procedures such that animal products were not involved in generation and growth of the cells. We have successfully identified such a protocol as a resource to facilitate widespread adoption of these practices.

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