Neurological Disorders

Coding Dimension ID: 
303
Coding Dimension path name: 
Neurological Disorders

Development of Novel Autophagy Inducers to Block the Progression of and Treat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06693
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 278 080
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects motor neurons (MNs). It results in paralysis and loss of control of vital functions, such as breathing, leading to premature death. Life expectancy of ALS patients averages 2–5 years from diagnosis. About 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year, and about 30,000 Americans have the disease. There is a clear unmet need for novel ALS therapeutics because no drug blocks the progression of ALS. This may be due to the fact that multiple proteins work together to cause the disease and therapies targeting individual toxic proteins will not prevent neurodegeneration due to other factors involved in the ALS disease process. We propose to develop a novel ALS therapy involving small molecule drugs that stimulate a natural defense system in MNs, autophagy, which will remove all of the disease-causing proteins in MNs to reduce neurodegeneration. We previously reported on a class of neuronal autophagy inducers (NAIs) and in this grant will prioritize those drugs for blocking neurodegeneration of human iPSC derived MNs from patients with familial and sporadic ALS to identify leads that will then be tested for efficacy in vivo in animal models of ALS to select a clinical candidate. Since all of our NAIs are FDA approved for treating indications other than ALS, our clinical candidate could be rapidly transitioned to testing for efficacy and safety in treating ALS patients near the end of this grant.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS as well as Alzheimer’s (AD), Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s Disease (HD) are devastating to the patient and family and create a major financial burden to California (CA). These diseases are due to the buildup of toxic misfolded proteins in key neuronal populations that leads to neurodegeneration. This suggests that common mechanisms may be operating in these diseases. The drugs we are developing to treat ALS target this common mechanism, which we believe is an impairment of autophagy that prevents clearance of disease-causing proteins. Effective autophagy inducers we identify to treat ALS may turn out to be effective in treating other neurodegenerative diseases. This could have a major impact on the health care in CA. Most important in our studies is the translational impact of the use of patient iPSC-derived neurons and astrocytes to identify a new class of therapeutics to block neurodegeneration that can be quickly transitioned to testing in clinical trials for treating ALS and other CNS diseases. Future benefits to CA citizens include: 1) development of new treatments for ALS with application to other diseases such as AD, HD and PD that affect thousands of individuals in CA; 2) transfer of new technologies to the public realm with resulting IP revenues coming into the state with possible creation of new biotechnology spin-off companies and resulting job creation; and 3) reductions in extensive care-giving and medical costs.

Programming Human ESC-derived Neural Stem Cells with MEF2C for Transplantation in Stroke

Funding Type: 
Early Translational IV
Grant Number: 
TR4-06788
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$2 124 000
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Stroke
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke). In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Potential benefits will outweigh risks because only patients with severe strokes that have compromised activities of daily living to an extreme degree will initially be treated. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. We will give drugs to avoid rejection of the transplanted cells. Thus, the treatment should be safe. We will first test the cells in stroke models in rodents (mice and rats) in preparation for a human clinical trial. We will collect comprehensive data on the mice and rats to determine if the stem cells indeed become new nerve cells to replace the damaged tissue and to assess if the behavior of the mice and rats has improved. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach has the potential for revolutionizing stroke therapy.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The goal of this project is to produce a stem cell-based therapy for stroke (also known as an ischemic cerebral infarct). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the State of California, and a leading cause of disability among adults. Currently, there are no effective treatments once a stroke has occurred (termed completed stroke), and the quality of life is severely compromised in those that survive the malady. In this proposal, we aim to develop human stem cells for therapeutic transplantation to treat stroke. Using a novel approach, we will generate stem cells that do not form tumors, but instead only make new nerve cells. If successfully developed and commercialized, this approach could provide a therapeutic candidate for the unmet medical need, which would have a tremendous impact on the quality of life for the patient, his or her family, and for the economic and emotional burden on the State of California and its citizens.

Human ES cell-derived MGE inhibitory interneuron transplantation for spinal cord injury

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05606
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 623 251
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Transplantation of neuronal precursors into the central nervous system offers great promise for the treatment of neurological disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI). Among the most significant consequences of SCI are bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain, both of which likely result from a reduction in those spinal inhibitory mechanisms that are essential for normal bladder and sensory functions. Our preliminary data show that embryonic inhibitory neuron precursor cells integrate in the adult nervous system and increase inhibitory network activity. Therefore inhibitory nerve cell transplants could be a powerful way to establish new inhibitory circuits in the injured spinal cord that will reduce bladder spasticity and attenuate central neuropathic pain. We already have proof-of-principle data that murine inhibitory nerve cells integrate in the adult spinal cord and improve symptoms in an animal model of chronic spinal cord injury. We have also recently developed methods to create human inhibitory interneurons from embryonic stem cells. This proposal will capitalize on these recent developments and determine whether our human embryonic stem cell-derived inhibitory cells can be successfully transplanted into the grey matter of the injured spinal cord and reduce neurogenic bladder dysfunction and neuropathic pain, two major causes of suffering in chronic SCI patients. If successful, our studies will lay the groundwork for a potential novel therapy for chronic SCI.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
There are an estimated 260,000 individuals in the United States who currently live with disability associated with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Symptoms of chronic SCI include bladder dyssynergia reflected by incontinence coincident with asynchronous contraction of internal and external sphincters, and central neuropathic pain, both of which severely impede activities of daily living, reduce quality of life, and contribute to the very high medical costs of caring for the Californians who suffer from chronic spinal cord injury. The Geron trial for SCI, as well as other cell-based approaches, aim to treat acute SCI. This proposal considers a different potentially complementary cell-transplantation strategy that is directed to more chronic SCI with the goal of improving bladder function and reducing pain. We propose to use cell grafts of inhibitory interneurons that we have derived from human stem cells in order to provide a novel treatment. If successful, we will have defined a therapeutic option that targets the most prevalent population of spinal cord injured patients. As the country's most populous state, California has the largest number of patients with chronic SCI, approximately 12,000. The estimated economic cost to California in lost productivity and medical expenses amounts to $400,000,000 annually. The potential savings in medical care costs, and improvement in quality of life will therfore have a disproportional benefit to the state of California.
Progress Report: 
  • From the past six months of work, we report considerable progress toward our aims of investigating the safety and efficacy of human inhibitory nerve precursor (MGE) cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury-induced bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain. Our first aim details the injection of human MGE cells into the uninjured rodent spinal cord and investigation of cell fate and potential adverse side effects from their transplantation. During the reporting period, we completed histological analyses for the two-month time point post-injection, and we found that the human MGE cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), appropriately matured into forebrain-type inhibitory interneurons in the rodent spinal cord. Also, we initiated histological examination of animals six months post-injection and detected robust human cell survival, dispersal into the spinal cord grey matter, and neuronal maturation, but no evidence of tumor formation. In addition, we completed behavioral analyses of animals injected with hESC-derived MGE cells at two and six months post-injection. Thus far, we have not observed any adverse side effects when human MGE cells are transplanted into the uninjured animal as determined by measures of body weight, locomotion, bladder function, and pain sensitivity.
  • Since the beginning of this project, we report considerable progress toward our aims of investigating the safety and efficacy of human inhibitory nerve precursor (MGE) cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury-induced bladder spasticity and neuropathic pain. In year one of this award we completed the major objectives of Aim1, namely to explore the survival, integration, and cell fate of stem cell-derived MGE cell transplants in the uninjured rodent spinal cord. We have now obtained preliminary efficacy results from Aim 2, namely the effects of hESC-MGE cells injected in spinal cord injured animals. Behavioral testing has been obtained to assess pain thresholds for all injected animals up to the six month endpoint, and measures of bladder spasticity have been obtained at six months post cell injection. We are evaluating whether the unblinded data demonstrates amelioration of neuropathic pain and bladder spasticity. Our preliminary histological analysis shows robust human cell survival, distribution, and neuronal differentiation, and we have electrophysiological data indicating functional integration of the transplanted cells. We are on track to complete all aims by the end of the award period.

Functional Neural Relay Formation by Human Neural Stem Cell Grafting in Spinal Cord Injury

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05628
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$4 699 569
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
We aim to develop a novel stem cell treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) that is substantially more potent than previous stem cell treatments. By combining grafts of neural stem cells with scaffolds placed in injury sites, we have been able to optimize graft survival and filling of the injury site. Grafted cells extend long distance connections with the injured spinal cord above and below the lesion, while the host spinal cord also sends inputs to the neural stem cell implants. As a result, new functional relays are formed across the lesion site. These result in substantially greater functional improvement than previously reported in animal studies of stem cell treatment. Work proposed in this grant will identify the optimal human neural stem cells for preclinical development. Furthermore, in an unprecedented step in spinal cord injury research, we will test this treatment in appropriate preclinical models of SCI to provide the greatest degree of validation for human translation. Successful findings could lead to clinical trials of the most potent neural stem cell approach to date.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects approximately 1.2 million people in the United States, and there are more than 11,000 new injuries per year. A large number of spinal cord injured individuals live in California, generating annual State costs in the billions of dollars. This research will examine a novel stem cell treatment for SCI that could result in functional improvement, greater independence and improved life styles for injured individuals. Results of animal testing of this approach to date demonstrate far greater functional benefits than previous stem cell therapies. We will generate neural stem cells from GMP-compatible human embryonic stem cells, then test them in the most clinically relevant animal models of SCI. These studies will be performed as a multi-center collaborative effort with several academic institutions throughout California. In addition, we will leverage expertise and resources currently in use for another CIRM-funded project for ALS, thereby conserving State resources. If successful, these studies will form the basis for clinical trials in a disease of great unmet medical need, spinal cord injury. Moreover, the development of this therapy would reduce costs for clinical care while bringing novel biomedical resources to the State.
Progress Report: 
  • In the first 12 months of this project we have made important progress in the following areas:
  • 1) Identified the lead embryonic stem cell type for potential use in a translational clinical program.
  • 2) Replicated the finding that implants of ES-derived neural progenitor cells from this lead cell type extend axons out from the spinal cord lesion site in very high numbers and over very long distances.
  • 3) Begun efforts to scale this work to larger animal models of spinal cord injury.

A Phase I/IIa Dose Escalation Safety Study of [REDACTED] in Patients with Cervical Sensorimotor Complete Spinal Cord Injury

Funding Type: 
Strategic Partnership III Track A
Grant Number: 
SP3A-07552
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$14 323 318
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
The proposed project is designed to assess the safety and preliminary activity of escalating doses of human embryonic stem cell derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) for the treatment of spinal cord injury. OPCs have two important functions: they produce factors which stimulate the survival and growth of nerve cells after injury, and they mature in the spinal cord to produce myelin, the insulation which enables electrical signals to be conducted within the spinal cord. Clinical testing of this product initiated in 2010 after extensive safety and efficacy testing in more than 20 nonclinical studies. Initial clinical safety testing was conducted in five subjects with neurologically complete thoracic injuries. No safety concerns have been observed after following these five subjects for more than two years. The current project proposes to extend testing to subjects with neurologically complete cervical injuries, the intended population for further clinical development, and the population considered most likely to benefit from the therapy. Initial safety testing will be performed in three subjects at a low dose level, with subsequent groups of five subjects at higher doses bracketing the range believed most likely to result in functional improvements. Subjects will be monitored both for evidence of safety issues and for signs of neurological improvement using a variety of neurological, imaging and laboratory assessments. By completion of the project, we expect to have accumulated sufficient safety and dosing data to support initiation of an expanded efficacy study of a single selected dose in the intended clinical target population.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed project has the potential to benefit the state of California by improving medical outcomes for California residents with spinal cord injuries (SCIs), building on California’s leadership position in the field of stem cell research, and creating high quality biotechnology jobs for Californians. Over 12,000 Americans suffer an SCI each year, and approximately 1.3 million people in the United States are estimated to be living with a spinal cord injury. Although specific estimates for the state of California are not available, the majority of SCI result from motor vehicle accidents, falls, acts of violence, and recreational sporting activities, all of which are common in California. Thus, the annual incidence of SCI in California is likely equal to or higher than the 1,400 cases predicted by a purely population-based distribution of the nationwide incidence. The medical, societal and economic burden of SCI is extraordinarily high. Traumatic SCI most commonly impacts individuals in their 20s and 30s, resulting in a high-level of permanent disability in young and previously healthy individuals. At one year post injury, only 11.8% of SCI patients are employed, and fewer than 35% are employed even at more than twenty years post-injury (NSCISC Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures 2013). Life expectancies of SCI patients are significantly below those of similar aged patients with no SCI. Additionally, many patients require help with activities of daily living such as feeding and bathing. As a result, the lifetime cost of care for SCI patients are enormous; a recent paper (Cao et al 2009) estimated lifetime costs of care for a patient obtaining a cervical SCI (the population to be enrolled in this study) at age 25 at $4.2 million. Even partial correction of any of the debilitating consequences of SCI could enhance activities of daily living, increase employment, and decrease reliance on attendant and medical care, resulting in substantial improvements in both quality of life and cost of care for SCI patients. California has a history of leadership both in biotechnology and in stem cell research. The product described in this application was invented in California, and has already undergone safety testing in five patients in a clinical study initiated by a California corporation. The applicant, who has licensed this product from its original developer and recruited many of the employees responsible for its previous development, currently employs 17 full-time employees at its California headquarters, with plans to significantly increase in size over the coming years. The successful performance of the proposed project would enable significant additional jobs creation in preparation for pivotal trials and product registration.

Paracrine and synaptic mechanisms underlying neural stem cell-mediated stroke recovery

Funding Type: 
Basic Biology V
Grant Number: 
RB5-07363
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$1 178 370
Disease Focus: 
Stroke
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
Embryonic Stem Cell
oldStatus: 
Closed
Public Abstract: 
Stem cell therapy holds promise for the almost million Americans yearly who suffer a stroke. Preclinical data have shown that human neural stem cells (hNSCs) aid recovery after stroke, resulting in a major effort to advance stem cell therapy to the clinic, and we are currently transitioning our hNSC product to the clinic for stroke therapy. In this proposal we will explore how these cells improve lost function. We have already shown that injected hNSCs secrete factors that promote the gross rewiring of the brain, a major component of the spontaneous recovery observed after stroke. We now intend to focus on the connections between neurons, the synapses, which are a critical part of this rewiring process. We aim to quantify the effect of hNSCs on synapse density and function, and explore whether the stem cells secrete restorative synaptogenic factors or form functional synapses with pre-existing neurons. Our pursuit is made possible by our combination of state-of-the-art imaging techniques enabling us to visualize, characterize, and quantify these tiny synaptic structures and their interaction with the hNSCs. Furthermore, by engineering the hNSCs we can identify the factors they secrete in the brain and identify those which modulate synaptic connections. Our proposed studies will provide important insight into how transplanted stem cells induce recovery after stroke, with potential applicability to other brain diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Cerebrovascular stroke is the fourth leading cause of mortality in the United States and a significant source of long-term physical and cognitive disability that has devastating consequences to patients and their families. In California alone, over 9% of adults 65 years or older have had a stroke according to a 2005 study. In the next 20 years the societal toll is projected to amount to millions of patients and 18.8 billion dollars per year in direct medical costs. To date, there is no approved therapeutic agent for the recovery phase after stroke, making the long-term care of stroke patients a tremendous socioeconomic burden that will continue to rise as our aging population increases. Our laboratory and others have demonstrated the promise of stem cell transplantation to treat stroke. We are dedicated to developing human neural stem cells (hNSCs) as a novel neuro-restorative treatment for lost motor function after stroke. The goal of our proposed work is to further understand how transplanted hNSCs improve stroke recovery, as dissecting the mechanism of action of stem cells in the stroke brain will ultimately improve the chance of clinical success. This could potentially provide significant cost savings to California, but more importantly benefit the thousands of Californians and their families who struggle with the aftermath of stroke.

Molecular Imaging for Stem Cell Science and Clinical Application

Funding Type: 
Research Leadership 12
Grant Number: 
LA1_C12-06919
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$6 443 455
Disease Focus: 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Neurological Disorders
Spinal Cord Injury
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Stem cells offer tremendous potential to treat previously intractable diseases. The clinical translation of these therapies, however, presents unique challenges. One challenge is the absence of robust methods to monitor cell location and fate after delivery to the body. The delivery and biological distribution of stem cells over time can be much less predictable compared to conventional therapeutics, such as small-molecule therapeutic drugs. This basic fact can cause road blocks in the clinical translation, or in the regulatory path, which may cause delays in getting promising treatments into patients. My research aims to meet these challenges by developing new non-invasive cell tracking platforms for emerging stem cell therapies. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the feasibility of non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells in patients. This project will build on these developments by creating next-generation cell tracking technologies with improved detectability and functionality. Additionally, I will provide leadership in the integration of non-invasive cell tracking into stem cell clinical trials. Specifically, this project will follow three parallel tracks. (1) The first track leverages molecular genetics to develop new nucleic acid-based MRI reporters. These reporters provide instructions to program a cell’s innate machinery so that they produce special proteins with magnetic properties that impart MRI contrast to cells, and allow the cells to be seen. My team will create neural stem cell lines with MRI reporters integrated into their genome so that those neural stem cell lines, and their daughter cells, can be tracked days and months after transfer into a patient. (2) The second track will develop methods to detect stem cell viability in vivo using perfluorocarbon-based biosensors that can measure a stem cell's intracellular oxygen level. This technology can potentially be used to measure stem cell engraftment success, to see if the new cells are joining up with the other cells where they are placed. (3) The third project involves investigating the role that the host’s inflammatory response plays in stem cell engraftment. These studies will employ novel perfluorocarbon imaging probes that enable MRI visualization and quantification of places in the body where inflammation is occurring. Overall, MRI cell tracking methods will be applied to new stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, and other disease states, in collaboration with CIRM-funded investigators.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
California leads the nation in supporting stem cell research with the aim of finding cures for major diseases afflicting large segments of the state’s population. Significant resources are invested in the design of novel cellular therapeutic strategies and associated clinical trials. To accelerate the clinical translation of these potentially live saving therapies, many physicians need method to image the behavior and movement of cells non-invasively following transplant into patients. My research aims to meet these challenges by developing new cell tracking imaging platforms for emerging stem cell therapies. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the feasibility of non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells in patients. This project will build on these developments by leading the integration of MRI cell tracking into stem cell clinical trials and by developing next-generation technologies with improved sensitivity and functionality. Initially, MRI cell tracking methods will be applied to new stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. In vivo MRI cell tracking can accelerate the process of deciding whether to continue at the preclinical and early clinical trial stages, and can facilitate smaller, less costly trials by enrolling smaller patient numbers. Imaging can potentially yield data about stem cell engraftment success. Moreover, MRI cell tracking can help improve safety profiling and can potentially lower regulatory barriers by verifying survival and location of transplanted cells. Overall, in vivo MRI cell tracking can help maximize the impact of the State’s investment in stem cell therapies by speeding-up clinical translation into patients. These endeavors are intrinsically collaborative and multidisciplinary. My project will create a new Stem Cell Imaging Center (SCIC) in California with a comprehensive set of ways to elucidate anatomical, functional, and molecular behavior of stem cells in model systems. The SCIC will provide scientific leadership to stem cell researchers and clinicians in the region, including a large number of CIRM-funded investigators who wish to bring state-of-the-art imaging into their clinical development programs. Importantly, the SCIC will focus intellectual talent on biological imaging for the state and the country. This project will help make MRI cell tracking more widespread clinically and position California to take a leadership role in driving this technology. An extensive infrastructure of MRI scanners already exist in California, and these advanced MRI methods would use this medical infrastructure better to advance stem cell therapies. Moreover, this project will lead to innovative new MRI tools and pharmaceutical imaging agents, thus providing economic benefits to California via the formation of new commercial products, industrial enterprises, and jobs.
Progress Report: 
  • Stem cells offer tremendous potential to treat previously intractable diseases. However, the clinical translation of these therapies presents unique challenges. One of which is the absence of robust methods to monitor cell location and fate after delivery to the body. The delivery and biological distribution of stem cells over time can be much less predictable compared to conventional therapeutics, such as small-molecule therapeutic drugs. This basic fact can cause road blocks in the clinical translation, or in the regulatory path, which may cause delays in getting promising treatments into patients. My research aims to meet these challenges by developing new non-invasive cell tracking platforms for emerging stem cell therapies. Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the feasibility of non-invasive monitoring of transplanted cells in patients. This project will build on these developments, by creating next-generation cell tracking technologies with improved detectability and functionality. In year 1 of this project, we have begun to evaluate emerging stem cell imaging technologies called MRI reporters, or DNA-based instructions, that when placed into a cell’s genome causes the cell to produce a protein that is detectable with MRI. We have constructed human neural progenitor cell (NPC) lines that integrally contain the MRI reporter so that the primary cell and its progeny can be visualized using MRI. This technology enables long term tracking of the NPCs’ fate and movements in the body. We use an NPC cell type that is currently being used in clinical trials to treat major diseases such as ALS and spinal cord injury. Our initial MRI experiments in a model system have demonstrated MRI detection of NPCs following transfer into the brain. In other developments over the past year, we have helped build a new multi-modal in vivo molecular imaging center at the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine. This new resource is now fully functional and is able to serve a broad range of stem cell investigators at the Consortium, adjacent academic institutions, and local industry. Ongoing activities include the implementation of the most up-to-date methodologies for in vivo cell tracking using the molecular imaging instruments, as well as educating stem cell scientists at the Sanford Consortium and elsewhere in the region about the value of non-invasive imaging for accelerating their research.

Generation and characterization of high-quality, footprint-free human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from 3,000 donors to investigate multigenic diseases

Funding Type: 
hiPSC Derivation
Grant Number: 
ID1-06557
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$16 000 000
Disease Focus: 
Developmental Disorders
Genetic Disorder
Heart Disease
Infectious Disease
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Autism
Respiratory Disorders
Vision Loss
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate to nearly any cells of the body, thereby providing a new paradigm for studying normal and aberrant biological networks in nearly all stages of development. Donor-specific iPSCs and differentiated cells made from them can be used for basic and applied research, for developing better disease models, and for regenerative medicine involving novel cell therapies and tissue engineering platforms. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor; the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor, producing a very valuable cell type as a disease model. To facilitate wider access to large numbers of iPSCs in order to develop cures for polygenic diseases, we will use a an episomal reprogramming system to produce 3 well-characterized iPSC lines from each of 3,000 selected donors. These donors may express traits related to Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cerebral palsy, diabetes, or respiratory diseases. The footprint-free iPSCs will be derived from donor peripheral blood or skin biopsies. iPSCs made by this method have been thoroughly tested, routinely grown at large scale, and differentiated to produce cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. The 9,000 iPSC lines developed in this proposal will be made widely available to stem cell researchers studying these often intractable diseases.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer great promise to the large number of Californians suffering from often intractable polygenic diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and respiratory disease. iPSCs can be generated from numerous adult tissues, including blood or skin, in 4–5 weeks and then differentiated to almost any desired terminal cell type. When iPSCs are derived from a disease-carrying donor, the iPSC-derived differentiated cells may show the same disease phenotype as the donor. In these cases, the cells will be useful for understanding disease biology and for screening drug candidates, and California researchers will benefit from access to a large, genetically diverse iPSC bank. The goal of this project is to reprogram 3,000 tissue samples from patients who have been diagnosed with various complex diseases and from healthy controls. These tissue samples will be used to generate fully characterized, high-quality iPSC lines that will be banked and made readily available to researchers for basic and clinical research. These efforts will ultimately lead to better medicines and/or cellular therapies to treat afflicted Californians. As iPSC research progresses to commercial development and clinical applications, more and more California patients will benefit and a substantial number of new jobs will be created in the state.

Collection of skin biopsies to prepare fibroblasts from patients with Alzheimer's disease and cognitively healthy elderly controls

Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06589
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$643 693
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in the elderly, affects over 5 million Americans. There are no treatments to slow progression or prevent AD. This reflects limitations in knowledge of mechanisms underlying AD, and in tools and models for early development and testing of treatment. Genetic breakthroughs related to early onset AD led to initial treatment targets related to a protein called amyloid, but clinical trials have been negative. Extensive research links genetic risk to AD, even when the age at onset is after the age of 65. AD affects the brain alone, therefore studying authentic nerve cells in the laboratory should provide the clearest insights into mechanisms and targets for treatment. This has recently become feasible due to advances in programming skin cells into stem cells and then growing (differentiating) them into nerve cells. In this project we will obtain skin biopsies from a total of 220 people with AD and 120 controls, who are extensively studied at the [REDACTED] AD Research Center. These studies include detailed genetic (DNA) analysis, which will allow genetic risks to be mapped onto reprogrammed cells. These derived cells that preserve the genetic background of the person who donated the skin biopsy will be made available to the research community, and have the promise to accelerate studies of mechanisms of disease, understanding genetic risk, new treatment targets, and screening of new treatments for this devastating brain disorder.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
The proposed project will provide a unique and valuable research resource, which will be stored and managed in California. This resource will consist of skin cells or similar biological samples, suitable for reprogramming, obtained from well-characterized patients with Alzheimer's Disease and cognitively healthy elderly controls. Its immediate impact will be to benefit CIRM-funded researchers as well as the greater research community, by providing them access to critical tools to study, namely nerve cells that can be grown in a dish (cultured) that retain the genetic background of the skin cell donors. This technology to develop and reprogram cells into nerve cells or other cell types results from breakthroughs in stem cell research, many of which were developed using CIRM funding. Alzheimer's Disease affects over 600,000 Californians, and lacks effective treatment. Research into mechanisms of disease, identifying treatment targets, and screening novel drugs will be greatly improved and accelerated through the availability of the resources developed by this project, which could have a major impact on the heath of Californians. California is home to world class academic and private research institutes, Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Companies, many of whom are already engaged in AD research. This project could provide them with tools to make research breakthroughs and pioneer the development of novel treatments for AD.

CIRM Tissue Collection for Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

Funding Type: 
Tissue Collection for Disease Modeling
Grant Number: 
IT1-06611
ICOC Funds Committed: 
$874 135
Disease Focus: 
Neurological Disorders
Pediatrics
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
oldStatus: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Most children who go to the clinic with brain disorders have symptoms combining autism, cerebral palsy and epilepsy, suggesting underlying and shared mechanisms of brain dysfunction in these conditions. Such disorders affect 4-6% of the population with life-long disease, and account for about 10% of health care expenditures in the US. Genetic studies have pointed to frequent low-penetrant or low-frequency genetic alterations, but there is no clear way to use this information to make gene-specific diagnosis, to predict short- or long-term prognosis or to develop disease-specific therapy. We propose to recruit about 500 patients with these disorders mostly from our Children’s Hospital, through a dedicated on-site collaborative approach. Extracting from existing medical records, taking advantage of years of experience in recruitment and stem cell generation, and already existing or planned whole exome or genome sequencing on most patients, we propose a safe, anonymous database linked to meaningful biological, medical, radiographic and genetic data. Because team members will be at the hospital, we can adjust future disease-specific recruitment goals depending upon scientific priorities, and re-contact patients if necessary. The clinical data, coupled with the proposed hiPSC lines, represents a platform for cell-based disease investigation and therapeutic discovery, with benefits to the children of California.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
This project can benefit Californians both in financial and non-financial terms. NeuroDevelopmental Disabilities (NDDs) affect 4-6% of Californians, create a huge disease burden estimated to account for 10% of California health care costs, and have no definitive treatments. Because we cannot study brain tissue directly, it is extraordinarily difficult to arrive at a specific diagnosis for affected children, so doctors are left ordering costly and low-yield tests, which limit prognostic information, counseling, prevention strategies, quality of life, and impede initiation of potentially beneficial therapies. Easily obtainable skin cells from Californians will be the basis of this project, so the study results will have maximal relevance to our own population. By combining “disease in a dish” platforms with cutting edge genomics, we can improve diagnosis and treatments for Californians and their families suffering from neurodevelopmental disorders. Additionally, this project, more than others, will help Californians financially because: 1] The ongoing evaluations of this group of patients utilizes medical diagnostics and genetic sequencing tools developed and manufactured in California, increasing our state revenues. 2] The strategy to develop “disease in a dish” projects centered on Neurodevelopmental Disabilities supports opportunities for ongoing efforts of California-based pharmaceutical and life sciences companies to leverage these discoveries for future therapies.

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