CSUN-UCLA Bridges to Stem Cell Research

CSUN-UCLA Bridges to Stem Cell Research

Funding Type: 
Bridges
Grant Number: 
TB1-01183
Award Value: 
$3,352,291
Status: 
Active
Public Abstract: 
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Progress Report: 

Year 1

Our CSUN-UCLA Bridges to Stem Cell Research Program trains students in world-leading UCLA institution labs for technical positions in stem cell research in academia and industry. Our interns are culturally and ethnically diverse, and has increased underrepresented groups engaged in stem cell research. In fact, over half of our 30 student interns are female, and 20/30 interns are culturally and/or ethicnally diverse. Seven of these students are considered underrepresented minorities by NIH. CSUN was recently ranked among the top five by the NSF for MS degree holders to earn a subsequent PhD degree, adding to the diversity of stem cell teachers and researchers at California institutions. Currently, we have sent four students on to a PhD program and five students to a Medical degree program. Our training program also provides scientists and technical staff for California's biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and stem cell companies, whose success will propel hiring and increased economic prosperity for the state. two of our students are currently performing academic research and two are currently working in industry. UCLA supports a scientific enterprise of $900M+ in extramural funding (2007) with ~$46M in CIRM grants and is one of the largest State employers with economic activity generating $1.2B annually in taxes. Each dollar of taxpayer investment generates almost $15 in economic activity. CSUN also generates $900M+ million for the regional economy. This impact sustains more than 13,500 jobs and generates $57M per year in tax revenue. Our CIRM trainees have a tangible health and economic impact for California, its academic institutions and biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and stem cell companies, and the rest of the nation as California and its citizens move forward with personalized medicine during the 21st century.

Year 2

Our CSUN-UCLA Bridges to Stem Cell Research Program trains students in world-leading UCLA institution labs for technical positions in stem cell research in academia and industry. Our interns are culturally and ethnically diverse, and has increased underrepresented groups engaged in stem cell research. In fact, over half of our 40 student interns are female, and 30/40 interns are culturally and/or ethicnally diverse. Nine of these students are considered underrepresented minorities by NIH. CSUN was recently ranked among the top five by the NSF for MS degree holders to earn a subsequent PhD degree, adding to the diversity of stem cell teachers and researchers at California institutions. Currently, we have sent five students on to a PhD program and five students to a Medical degree program. Our training program also provides scientists and technical staff for California's biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and stem cell companies, whose success will propel hiring and increased economic prosperity for the state. Four of our students are currently performing academic research and one is currently working in industry. Currently, we have eight trainees with scientific papers published in top peer-reviewed journals. UCLA supports a scientific enterprise of $900M+ in extramural funding (2007) with ~$46M in CIRM grants and is one of the largest State employers with economic activity generating $1.2B annually in taxes. Each dollar of taxpayer investment generates almost $15 in economic activity. CSUN also generates $900M+ million for the regional economy. This impact sustains more than 13,500 jobs and generates $57M per year in tax revenue. Our CIRM trainees have a tangible health and economic impact for California, its academic institutions and biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and stem cell companies, and the rest of the nation as California and its citizens move forward with personalized medicine during the 21st century.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine