Identifying Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease with Human Neurons Made From Human IPS cells

Identifying Drugs for Alzheimer's Disease with Human Neurons Made From Human IPS cells

Funding Type: 
Early Translational III
Grant Number: 
TR3-05577
Approved funds: 
$1,774,420
Disease Focus: 
Alzheimer's Disease
Neurological Disorders
Stem Cell Use: 
iPS Cell
Cell Line Generation: 
iPS Cell
Public Abstract: 
We propose to discover new drug candidates for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which is common, fatal, and for which no effective disease-modifying drugs are available. Because no effective AD treatment is available or imminent, we propose to discover novel candidates by screening purified human brain cells made from human reprogrammed stem cells (human IPS cells or hIPSC) from patients that have rare and aggressive hereditary forms of AD. We have already discovered that such human brain cells exhibit an unique biochemical behavior that indicates early development of AD in a dish. Thus, we hope to find new drugs by using the new tools of human stem cells that were previously unavailable. We think that human brain cells in a dish will succeed where animal models and other types of cells have thus far failed.
Statement of Benefit to California: 
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that afflicts millions of Californians. The emotional and financial impact on families and on the state healthcare budget is enormous. This project seeks to find new drugs to treat this terrible disease. If we are successful our work in the long-term may help diminish the social and familial cost of AD, and lead to establishment of new businesses in California using our approaches to drug discovery for AD.
Progress Report: 

Year 1

We have made steady and significant progress in developing a way to use human reprogrammed stem cells to develop drugs for Alzheimer's disease. In the more recent project term we have further refined our key assay, and generated sufficient cells to enable screening of 50,000 different chemical candidates that might reveal potential drugs for this terrible disease. With a little bit of additional refinement, we will be able to begin our search in earnest in collaboration with the Sanford-Burnham Prebys Screening Center.

© 2013 California Institute for Regenerative Medicine